History - 1650 building of Griffin's Wharf, Boston

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Sunday 19 April 2009 5.00pm
Am hoping to find another "history nut" out there, since am trying to identify the (British) builder of "Griffin's Wharf" in Boston,Mass. and possible connection with the
"Ship Griffin," sailing between England and Colonies approximately 1645-1700's. The master of the "Griffin" at this time was Robert Grimshaw, Liverpool. My theory is that the owner of this ship was also the builder of The Wharf at Boston which bears the same name, since it is logical that a wharf was needed to berth the vessel.
Any help out there? Cheers!
Sunday 19 April 2009 6.15pm
I haven't managed to find a reference to the Southwark Griffin or Griffin's Wharf earlier than 1794. Griffin Wharf was the only wharf on the south bank of the Thames that didn't come under the control of the Hay's Company in the early twentieth century, and I am not sure where any archives would be held.

BTW Are confusing two ships of the same name - the Griffin captained by Robert Grimshaw appears to have been a century later than the period you quote:

http://www.grimshaworigin.org/Webpages2/GrifnShip2.htm

Footnote: For those not knowing their colonial history, Griffin's Wharf, Boston was the location where the Dartmouth, Eleanor and Beaver were tied up while Bostonians refused to pay the tea duties, until they were boarded and their cargoes thrown into the harbour waters in the "Boston Tea Party" of 1773.
Sunday 19 April 2009 7.01pm
The "Ship Griffin" is described as that which carried the
Anne Hutchinson party from England to Boston, Msss 1638,
with a large contingent of Anglican dissenters. It apparently made many more trips through the following years, perhaps even being involved in 1770's slave trade.
I have no evidence as to the "Griffin's Wharf" (of Tea- Party fame,) being linked to the earlier ship, except for the practice at the time, of building a "company-wharf" in order to expedite landing of cargo etc. If the "Griffin" was in steady use in the mid-1600's as Hutchinson Party records indicate, then it is possible that the same English shipping company would have built the Griffin's Wharf at some later date. (Thanks for your
reply!) Audrey Hall
Sunday 19 April 2009 11.19pm
Audrey

It was the norm for the names of ships to be re-used. Practically, very few vessels would have had a sailing life of more tnan 30 years given the vicissitudes of the North Atlantic passage.

Also, given the time that it took for a sea voyage it would hardly be sensible to have a wharf for a single vessel.

Have you made any enquries of the Bostonian Society at the Old State House who might be able to provide you with information on the history of the wharf.
http://www.bostonhistory.org/
Monday 20 April 2009 1.32am
Lang: From the little I have unearthed, it seems the practice of "wharf building" carried advantages to the owners. . .from general fees for labor etc. to priority
for just being able to "tie up." Paul Revere's in-laws built and maintained "Hitchbourne's Wharf" as a way to enhance their merchant-class activities etc. I realize that ship "Griffin" is not the actual survivor into the Tea-Party days. . .but some research seems to suggest a continuity from earlier ownership. ( Hutchinsons, and Clarkes, of l638 voyage,have 5th generation descendants
building wharves in colonial Boston, prior to Revolution and bearing their names, etc. I am waiting a reply from the Boston Public Library, on reference from the Maritime Museum, and will try the resource you suggested. Many thanks!
Wednesday 3 July 2013 2.15am
Hi Audrey,

I was wondering if you had found out anymore info on Griffin's Wharf? I am currently doing my family's tree and when talking to my older brother he had mentioned that our grandfather stated that The Wharf was named after our family. They were English Torres and they were kicked out of America during or soon after the American Revolution. They went to St. John, New Brunswick, Canada. We have since then have sneaked back in! I don't know how true the story is and am just trying to see if it's true. Right now I can only trace back to my great, great, great, great grandfather, a Samual M. Griffin to early 1800's. Any info you have on the Griffin wharf and the names of the owners would be very helpful.

Thanks, William Griffin
Wednesday 3 July 2013 2.19pm
Greetings William! Have been away from website for awhile ..(4 years or so? ) Sorry
I have no results to report, after contacting most known Boston resources, Maritime Societies, etc. I had begun with my most accurate source, established via historical reporting of the "Shiip Griffiin" being the one that in 1638, carried direct ancestor
John Peckham,( a member of the "Hutchinson Party."). . to America. I have been lucky in learning much about this ancestor. . .but it was in later research that the
possible connection between the 1638 "Ship Griffin," and the name of the Boston Wharf, approximately 130 years later, occurred to me, especially because of the aforementioned history of the Clarke Wharf, et al. and how their descendants maintained the family connections to their wharves etc. Are there any records
re your PRE-revolutionary "Griffins" in America? In England? What is the earliest
of your records? Cheers! audrey hall
Friday 20 May 2016 1.52pm
I am new to this site and need to let you know that I've been researching James Griffin since 1974. He was the owner of Griffin's Wharf in Boston. Audrey, William needs to know this. I've combed through Boston records, wills, etc. and am probably related to William. I think that James' relatives resided in Roxbury or Dorchester, MA. Anyways, I would love contact with William to share our family info. Diana Butcher
Sunday 22 May 2016 12.46pm
James Griffin owned the wharf. I'm very interested in his lineage and descendants. I see no relationship to The Ship "Griffin" but never had given it a thought previously to just reading your message. I believe that Henry Laughton and James Griffin were both Loyalists and that Henry Laughton mar. Mary Griffin. I go back to Mercy/Marcy/Mary Griffin and most interested in anything on Griffin in the Boston area. Laughton removed, I believe, to London for safety before or during the evacuation.
Sunday 22 May 2016 12.49pm
James Griffin owned the wharf. I'm very interested in his lineage and descendants. I see no relationship to The Ship "Griffin" but never had given it a thought previously to just reading your message. I believe that Henry Laughton and James Griffin were both Loyalists and that Henry Laughton mar. Mary Griffin. I go back to Mercy/Marcy/Mary Griffin and most interested in anything on Griffin in the Boston area. Laughton removed, I believe, to London for safety before or during the evacuation.

What makes you think that Griffin didn't buy The Wharf already built. It was also called Rowe's Wharf if memory serves me correctly. There was a rope walks there, too. What sparked your interest, out of curiosity? I read every microfilm available on Griffin/Griffith that I could pertaining to Boston History/Genealogy with no success.
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