Cheers Tolstoy for tyre suggestion

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Sunday 11 July 2010 3.15pm
Didn't want to take the Cycle Superhighway thread off on an unconnected tangent about punctures.
Just read up on that armadillo tyre, and browsed Halfords and Evans. It seems much easier and quicker to insert a new tube than to mess about repairing a hole that might not hold. Tubes are pretty cheap anyway so I'll buy a couple of spares. Who wants to get stuck miles from home on a rainy day trying to patch a tube.
Took about 2 minutes to release the brake chain, flick the 'quick release lever' and the wheel popped off, two forks under the tyre and take out the tube. Tiny hole in tube and no damage to the tyre. I assume caused by under-inflation. A bloke in Evans told me you couldn't overinflate a tyre using a handpump even though the manual states you should stick to the psi guidelines.
Good Grief! what a fuss over a puncture--well it is my first.
Zoe
Sunday 11 July 2010 3.45pm
The first puncture is the worst, it feels like a major crisis (though I'm just the same about my car). I never fix punctures, it's so much easier to replace the tube.

Druid cycles will sort it for 10, I always think it's worth it to spare yourself the hassle.
Sunday 11 July 2010 7.14pm
Moral of the tale - always carry a spare tube and a handy pump. A tyre should 'ring' when you flick it with a finger to indicate the correct pressure, something hard to achieve with a hand pump. I always pop into Evans/Condor and top up with their track pumps.

Something else to bear in mind with any new tyre is they attract stones and potentially dubious shards due to the relative stickiness of the pristine surface. A week on the street sorts that out.
Monday 12 July 2010 11.10am
Patch the old one in the comfort of your kitchen, and keep that as a spare perhaps.
Wednesday 14 July 2010 5.30pm
Knew you'd be interested in the puncture saga update

Snippet from EvansCycles website where my Ridgeback 21" came from.
Choosing Your Inner Tube Size
It is imperative that you replace your inner tubes with a tube that is the right size according to the diameter and width for your tyre. The size is almost always written somewhere on the sidewall of the tyre for easy reference.


So I jot down the size from the tube 700x35/43c and drop into Evans London Bridge this afternoon.
The bloke tells me that the 700x28/38 is a suitable replacement. When I say I'd prefer to replace with the same dimensions he says the difference is slight and 'just pump it up a bit harder'. Why don't they stock tubes of every size especially as they sell bikes with 700x35/43c tubes in them. Anyway I took his word for it as on several bike forums people seemed to have the same problem replacing that particular size and settled for the slightly smaller size. Also bought a repair kit to fix the original. I do like tinkering with any kind of DIY so it was fun.
If the 700x28/38 blows within a week I'll take it back for a refund. What is so odd about the 700x35/43c anyway?
Wednesday 14 July 2010 6.42pm
Well full marks to Evans
I used the 'Contact Us' form on the evanscycles website to ask if the tubes sold to me are a suitable replacement and within 30 minutes got the reply:

Hello Anthony
If Your bike has the original tyres, (which are 700 x 37c) the tubes you have been sold at London Bridge are ideal, no need to increase the tyre pressure.

If you have any other questions please don't hesitate to contact us

Kind Regards

Mike Thyer
Evans Cycles
Wednesday 14 July 2010 6.53pm
If you get a puncture it'll not be down to the inner tube, just shear bad luck. I suspect the 35/43 probably comes straight from the manufacturer and is the optimum for the spec, however 28/38 (the mm range) is more flexible for a shop to stock. I run a 700x23 as I ride a fixie. The main rule of thumb is to pump the tyre to its maximum pressure and keep it there by topping up; gives for a faster ride (less rolling resistance) and presents a tough barrier for debris to penetrate. Most bike shops have a pump on hand for this, the only exception I've come across were Mosquito Bikes on Essex Rd who were rather unhelpful... their lose.

Glad your back on the road. Stay safe.
Thursday 15 July 2010 7.25am
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