Better Elephant: Transforming The Heygate Community-Led Exhibition, this Saturday 25th Feb

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Tuesday 21 February 2012 2.53pm
AN INVITATION:

Southwark Council and Lend Lease are due to release the ‘final masterplan’ for the Elephant & Castle regeneration this week. See here.

Some members of the local community have expressed discontent and major concerns with the current masterplan proposals. We think that the current masterplan fails to address the needs of the existing community, so we have come together to offer an alternative scheme based on a community-led initiative:

BETTER ELEPHANT

In order to launch our campaign and discuss our proposals, we are planning an exhibition this coming Saturday 25th Feb in the communal gardens of the Heygate estate.

We are inviting local residents and key professionals who have an interest in the future of our city, to join this important debate.

Our exhibition will examine the social, economic and environmental issues involved and discuss possible alternative initiatives.
See you on Saturday!
BETTER ELEPHANT”

Tuesday 21 February 2012 4.28pm
"Final Masterplan"? Where have I heard that before over the last ten years?
Tuesday 21 February 2012 10.12pm
jackie rokotnitz wrote:
"Final Masterplan"? Where have I heard that before over the last ten years?

Noted, but this is going to be a planning application - everything before has been indicative outlines and aspirations.
Thursday 23 February 2012 1.43pm
i'm confused by the BE masterplan, isn't that the old masterplan exactly (not that that's not good, that was an excellent proposal!)
Thursday 23 February 2012 3.18pm
jamesup wrote:
i'm confused by the BE masterplan, isn't that the old masterplan exactly (not that that's not good, that was an excellent proposal!)

Yes I am not sure I understand that one. There is a lot of good stuff in that old Framework that looks set to be dropped from the new one but the Elephant Amenity Network Visioning Event
http://elephantamenity.wordpress.com/2011/06/24/visioning-workshop-report/ wrote:
report
is more local, up to date and er..visionary!
Thursday 23 February 2012 4.55pm
Went along to look at this masterplan...OMG it is ABSOLUTELY DIRE, DIRE, DIRE. I could weep. The density is mind boggling. Having learned that high rises cause social problems and isolation, there are a huge amount of massive high rises. ~There seems to be nothing but an opportunity for property developers, I could see no places where jobs will be created, the overloading of services from such a huge increase in occupancy will soon become apparent. The traffic flow looks as though we will be one big traffic jam, and frankly the whole proposal is utterly dreadful. Shocking that that is what all these clever people have come up with.
Thursday 23 February 2012 7.29pm
Merlin Rouge wrote:
jamesup wrote:
i'm confused by the BE masterplan, isn't that the old masterplan exactly (not that that's not good, that was an excellent proposal!)

Yes I am not sure I understand that one. There is a lot of good stuff in that old Framework that looks set to be dropped from the new one but the Elephant Amenity Network Visioning Event
http://elephantamenity.wordpress.com/2011/06/24/visioning-workshop-report/ wrote:
report
is more local, up to date and er..visionary!

They re-wrote the page now so it's clearer, i think:

"We are currently in the process of drafting our plan based on some of the proposals made in the original 2004 masterplan, along with the recommendations made in the 1998 council-commissioned appraisal study".
Thursday 23 February 2012 10.03pm
High rises, done well, don't cause social problems. Look at the Barbican - that's a massively popular high rise development.

But, that needs lots of open space around the blocks and towers, cultural facilities and a permeable neighbourhood. It also means not putting too many troubled people in them and, probably, requires a reasonable proportion of residents with a commitment to the neighbourhood.

Unfortunately, I'm not sure that's what the developers have in mind for the E&C.
Friday 24 February 2012 12.09am
Rambling Phil wrote:
High rises, done well, don't cause social problems. Look at the Barbican - that's a massively popular high rise development.
But, that needs lots of open space around the blocks and towers, cultural facilities and a permeable neighbourhood. It also means not putting too many troubled people in them and, probably, requires a reasonable proportion of residents with a commitment to the neighbourhood.

Unfortunately, I'm not sure that's what the developers have in mind for the E&C.

I've never seen children playing out in the Barbican,and what do you mean by "troubled people"?
Friday 24 February 2012 4.18am
boroughonian wrote:
Rambling Phil wrote:
High rises, done well, don't cause social problems. Look at the Barbican - that's a massively popular high rise development.
But, that needs lots of open space around the blocks and towers, cultural facilities and a permeable neighbourhood. It also means not putting too many troubled people in them and, probably, requires a reasonable proportion of residents with a commitment to the neighbourhood.

Unfortunately, I'm not sure that's what the developers have in mind for the E&C.

I've never seen children playing out in the Barbican,and what do you mean by "troubled people"?

Being in one of the majority of households that is child-free, I've not seen having children playing as the most important feature of a successful neighbourhood, but I spend quite a lot of time in and around the Barbican and there are children around; there's a school in the middle of it and another one on Golden Lane.

The open spaces I referred to are necessary, among other things, to enable this. I don't see many children out playing in the low-rise, traffic infested neighbourhood I live in, either; I think this is a general urban planning problem rather than one just for high rise development.

By 'troubled', I mean things like 'mad', 'anti-social' (in the sense of not caring about the impact their actions have on others), or people who aren't choosing to live there - the sorts of hard to place tenants that the council often placed in the Heygate in its last years.

This is central London. It will be densely developed, and we have to look at what makes successful similar schemes work and demand that for here.
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