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Thursday 29 March 2012 10.32pm
I wondered if people who have dogs in the area might be able to help?

I grew up with dogs all my life and seriously miss having them in my life.

I was always told as a kid dogs in an apartment and/or place without a garden is cruel - I don't necessarily think that is the case now.

Anyway, I have moved to the area from the Midlands and live in a small flat, with a small outside space. I am out during working hours, home at the weekends, but my housemate is home during the day for 2/3 days per week.

1. So - is a dog, a small dog, a possibility or is it just not a good idea?

2. If you have a dog, I would love to hear your circumstances, living arrangements, work life etc.


Thanks so much - I have been playing this over in my mind for months now!
Zoe
Friday 30 March 2012 7.03am
Being in a flat isn't a problem as long as you walk them a lot. I have friends who have gardens who never walk their dogs as they think they don't need to (and don't even like walking, so why get a dog??!).

However, being out all day will be an issue, I think you should think about a rescue dog, as managing a puppy while at work will be really hard. Try battersea and consider a dog like a Staffie. I know not everyone likes them, but they make great pets and a proper Staffie isn't very big so fits well in a flat. You might also want to think about an ex-racing greyhound. They need a good walk everyday, but then sleep the rest of the time so in my experience can cope with being left alone (but tell the charity you will be leaving them alone so they can match you to the right dog).

Also, dogs cost money, a lot of money! You also have to get up early in the cold and rain, which seems fine now, but not when you are actually doing it. Also think about who will look after them when you need to spend a week in Spain.

Once you've worked through all the negatives, think about how lovely it is to come home to a dog, the great walks and holidays you will have together, and curling up together on the sofa on a wet Saturday afternoon to read a good book. There's nothing better!
Friday 30 March 2012 9.11am
Dogs are pack animals, would it be possible to have two small rescue dogs? And are your circumstances likely to stay the same, is it likely your flatmate will move out?

I too love dogs, my eighteen year old terrier cross died 2001 and every time I come home I still expect to see her looking at me with love and bounding up to greet me.

And now I am home all day, house and tatty garden find myself still not being able to have a dog because walking with a stick and a lovely dog on a lead not possible.

And take out pet insurance all the glass on our streets!
Friday 30 March 2012 12.18pm
Hi,

I work at More London and may be able to pop round to let out or take a dog for a quick walk during my lunch hour on any days when he/she is home alone for the day. You'll know if this is viable depending on where abouts you live. I'm a dog lover with experience sitting and walking a variety of breeds.

Please get in touch if I can help at all, I'd and references can be supplied.

James
Friday 30 March 2012 4.38pm
Apropos of nothing, I picked up an account customer at the Kennel Club in Clarges Street W1 some time back. Whilst driving her to her destination we got to talking about dogs, and she asked me if I had one.
I replied in the negative, but said that if I ever decided to get one, I'd likely go for a malumute, or husky type dog, as I thought that they were beautiful animals.
She said that you have to be very vigilant with that breed, they are pack animals, and if another dog walks into their view, they are inclined to "join up" with that dog and toddle off to start, (in the malumute's mind), a new pack.
The fact that you might worship the park that they exercise in, or supply the dog a plentiful supply of fillet steak doesn't mean diddly to the dog if he gets half a chance to join a new pack.
Saturday 31 March 2012 8.50am
I agree with Zoe here. It is possible to keep a dog in a flat as long as you are prepared to take it out often but they cannot be left alone for long hours during the day. Jan is right that they are pack animals though getting two which are then left alone will create even more problems. Indeed, it is always best to get one dog at a time, unless you are very experienced with keeping dogs. You would need someone to be around to take them out during the day and especially so with a puppy (and so a puppy is almost certainly best avoided in your case). Do work through all the practical difficulties and only if you can work this all out consider getting a dog. We have a lovely boy and wouldn't be without out him but it is one hell of a commitment (think child rather than cat and you are heading in the right direction).

Also, some breeds are more suitable than others. A Cavalier King Charles would, for instance, be fine in a flat whilst the above mentioned Malamute (along with a host of other very active breeds) would be a terrible choice. I would suggest you go and talk with the people at Battersea, they are very helpful and will be able to talk you through all of this.
Saturday 31 March 2012 9.08pm
Look at it from the dogs point of view. It's going to be shut up all day with nothing to do, dying for a pee/crap because it's been taught not to **** in the house.

It's just wrong.
Dogs are genetically wolves, designed to run across the tundra all day hunting. Dogs are pack animals and will try their best. You don't know what you are asking of them when you twist their nature like this.

Get a cat and put a cat flap in. Cats walk by themselves.
Cats can cope.
Saturday 31 March 2012 10.15pm
Tom Pepper wrote:
Apropos of nothing, I picked up an account customer at the Kennel Club in Clarges Street W1 some time back. Whilst driving her to her destination we got to talking about dogs, and she asked me if I had one.
I replied in the negative, but said that if I ever decided to get one, I'd likely go for a malumute, or husky type dog, as I thought that they were beautiful animals.
She said that you have to be very vigilant with that breed, they are pack animals, and if another dog walks into their view, they are inclined to "join up" with that dog and toddle off to start, (in the malumute's mind), a new pack.
The fact that you might worship the park that they exercise in, or supply the dog a plentiful supply of fillet steak doesn't mean diddly to the dog if he gets half a chance to join a new pack.

You were told utter rubbish. Which isn't at all surprising from someone associated with the kennel club. Malamutes are very testing and often ignore commands but they're more likely to start a fight with a strange dog than join up with them. There is something to be said for 'being alpha' with all dogs and especially with Malamutes or Huskies but just living with you will make you much more part of their family than a strange dog.
Saturday 31 March 2012 11.49pm
Thanks - all the above is very helpful!

I just don't know if I can bring myself to getting a dog; just not certain I have the space for it.

Maybe I will have to wait until I have earned my millions and have a county estate - some hope!!
Sunday 1 April 2012 10.54am
beetroot wrote:
Tom Pepper wrote:
Apropos of nothing, I picked up an account customer at the Kennel Club in Clarges Street W1 some time back. Whilst driving her to her destination we got to talking about dogs, and she asked me if I had one.
I replied in the negative, but said that if I ever decided to get one, I'd likely go for a malumute, or husky type dog, as I thought that they were beautiful animals.
She said that you have to be very vigilant with that breed, they are pack animals, and if another dog walks into their view, they are inclined to "join up" with that dog and toddle off to start, (in the malumute's mind), a new pack.
The fact that you might worship the park that they exercise in, or supply the dog a plentiful supply of fillet steak doesn't mean diddly to the dog if he gets half a chance to join a new pack.

You were told utter rubbish. Which isn't at all surprising from someone associated with the kennel club. Malamutes are very testing and often ignore commands but they're more likely to start a fight with a strange dog than join up with them. There is something to be said for 'being alpha' with all dogs and especially with Malamutes or Huskies but just living with you will make you much more part of their family than a strange dog.

I appreciate your setting me straight beetroot, you sound as you are are more "canine-wise" than the young lady who apparently misinformed me.
I hasten to add that she was an office employee of the Kennel Club, not someone in an executive position, perhaps she was just passing along what she thought to be true and not the gospel handed down from on high.
In the event that I do go the malumute route in the future your post has re-assured me.

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