If it happened tomorrow how would you fare?

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Thursday 6 December 2012 3.13pm
Don't know if this has been put up before,interesting.

http://bombsight.org/#10/51.5006/-0.1044
Thursday 6 December 2012 11.29pm
very interesting !! thanks for that :)
Friday 7 December 2012 10.10am
Thank you for directing us there, it really is most interesting especially for us who lived through it. Seeing an overview like this makes one wonder how we managed to survive the onslaught.
I live off The Cut and know that it suffered more damage than is shown and the great pity is the rebuilding has not resulted in one building of any architectural worth arising from the ashes, each new building has seemed to add to the ugliness of the street.
Friday 7 December 2012 1.45pm
Thebunhouse wrote:
Thank you for directing us there, it really is most interesting especially for us who lived through it. Seeing an overview like this makes one wonder how we managed to survive the onslaught.
I live off The Cut and know that it suffered more damage than is shown and the great pity is the rebuilding has not resulted in one building of any architectural worth arising from the ashes, each new building has seemed to add to the ugliness of the street.

People of my age can only imagine what it must have been like,everytime there is a firework display on the river I think about it.
That map give us some idea of the carnage.
Saturday 8 December 2012 2.38am
As a Blitz historian, author and guide I think the web site is an excellent piece of work and will be invaluable to family researchers, schools, local history societies etc as well as myself and like minded people. Quite a few local authority archives have little or no records of the Blitz eg Camden threw out Hampstead on the sixties (or Hampstead did) this really helps in areas like this. Although there are no casualty details I am fortunate to have a full set of the Commonwealth War Grave Commission WWII civilian lists and the site will underpin my research and future projects.
Saturday 8 December 2012 9.32pm
boroughonian wrote:
Thebunhouse wrote:
Thank you for directing us there, it really is most interesting especially for us who lived through it. Seeing an overview like this makes one wonder how we managed to survive the onslaught.
I live off The Cut and know that it suffered more damage than is shown and the great pity is the rebuilding has not resulted in one building of any architectural worth arising from the ashes, each new building has seemed to add to the ugliness of the street.

People of my age can only imagine what it must have been like,everytime there is a firework display on the river I think about it.
That map give us some idea of the carnage.

I can recall, as a veritable toddler, picking up tiny bits of shrapnel after the Luftwaffe had paid a visit, I remember burning my hands on the hot metal and my old Mum castigating me severely!
My elder son married a German girl and I forwarded the bombsight link to my eldest German grandson.
He sent back, "It was fortunate that our brave airmen missed you Opa, or else I would not be writing to you now!"
Saturday 8 December 2012 10.33pm
Neil P Bright wrote:
As a Blitz historian, author and guide I think the web site is an excellent piece of work and will be invaluable to family researchers, schools, local history societies etc as well as myself and like minded people. Quite a few local authority archives have little or no records of the Blitz eg Camden threw out Hampstead on the sixties (or Hampstead did) this really helps in areas like this. Although there are no casualty details I am fortunate to have a full set of the Commonwealth War Grave Commission WWII civilian lists and the site will underpin my research and future projects.
Neil P Bright: What's so inconceivable is that the Blitz happened over such a short period of time plus there was general bombing over the city and country throughout WW2. How did they cope? I Look forward to your new projects and info, please do keep it posted.
Tom Pepper: I like the cheeky comment from your son-in-law, that shows how far we've all (hopefully) moved on.
Saturday 8 December 2012 10.36pm
Oop's, your Grandson not son-in-law! :)
Zoe
Sunday 9 December 2012 10.46am
Looking at all the boroughs and then all the wards in Southwark, it seems that Cathedrals suffered the most bombs (160). I can see the one that did in the houses where our block is.

I have also noticed there are a number of green areas, like Burgess Park, which suffered loads of bombs. It's nice that something positive came out of it and we were able to create new parks. It's a shame there aren't more memorials included in the park (part of that is probablythe challenge in getting the information about what happened on each site).
Sunday 9 December 2012 9.52pm
mon2 wrote:
Neil P Bright: What's so inconceivable is that the Blitz happened over such a short period of time plus there was general bombing over the city and country throughout WW2. How did they cope?

My parents were scousers and both remembered their shelters vivdly. My Dad used to look terrified when a siren was in a film on telly. He thought he was hiding it but he would grip the arms of his chair. Stayed with him his whole life. He lost three brothers.
My Mum and Dad actually grew up on the same street and after a raid one night one of the houses in their terrace was rubble. The houses on each side were untouched. Not even a broken window.
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