Pedestrian crossings

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Monday 27 February 2017 8.30am
I'm in my early seventies and pretty fit (i.e. can walk up to 10 miles), but am I the only person who finds that where new equipment has been installed at pedestrian crossings, unless you are in "Ready, Steady, Go" mode when the pedestrian light is green, there is barely time to cross the road, other than walking very rapidly or running (and avoiding cyclists who go through the lights as happened to me yesterday). Am I the only person that thinks TFL (or whoever is responsible) has reduced the crossing times? (I know it's outside SE1 but in Kennington Lane, the times seem to be about 15 seconds or slightly more or less?.
Monday 27 February 2017 10.08am
I've noticed that the "green" light stays for a shorter time, but many lights now have a count down timer after green during which it is still safe to cross (red to traffic) and thus actually there now seems to be more time to cross in total?
Monday 27 February 2017 10.46am
No there isn't more time - I'm 99 per cent sure they have reduced the "green-man" time; if you look at a few crossings, the countdown of seconds to the side of the "green-man" comes on almost immediately. If you really think the times are longer try getting across the road in less than the current time - or start training as an Olympic sprinter!
Monday 27 February 2017 11.12am
Reducing pedestrian green light time, and increasing the delays between them, was the policy of the last Mayor - in the name of "improving traffic flow" (ie prioritising motor traffic over pedestrians). TfL adopted it. You're not imagining it.

The current mayor is saying the right sorts of things; he's appointed an active travel commissioner, Will Norman, to promote walking and cycling, and TfL has produced a "Healthy Streets for London (PDF)" policy document that talks about "Prioritising walking, cycling and public transport to create a healthy city".

So, this is an opportune time to lobby/put pressure on TfL & Will Norman to put their planning where their mouths are.
Tuesday 7 March 2017 11.16am
And it's not just older people. I don't have time to get across with my toddler and the dog. The crossing to the Co-op in Tower Bridge Road is dreadful in this respect.
Tuesday 7 March 2017 11.44am
Wasn't it Livingstone that slowed the traffic down in the first place. I don't know how stationary traffic will mean a healthy city.

Subways are the future (ahem).
Tuesday 7 March 2017 1.20pm
If subways are for the future, then put cars and other road traffic in them. The Elephant and Castle subway closures have been a real bonus for people like me who found them dark, dirty, smelly and unsafe (especially at night). Time allowed for pedestrian crossing depends on two different scenarios. Where the traffic is stopped to allow other traffic to move / cross etc, then obviously time has to be allowed for vehicles to get through. Where it's simply a question of allowing pedestrians to cross a road, then time allowed for this can be much shorter (e.g. Kennington Lane - where the crossing near Renfrew Road is barely 12 seconds!!) And we need to have far less cars, lorries etc. in Central London. I've given up my car completely and use public transport and my feet.
Zoe
Tuesday 7 March 2017 6.28pm
It's also very frustrating how long pedestrians have to wait on TfL controlled roads for the lights to change. It's noticeable the difference between council and TfL crossings.
Thursday 9 March 2017 11.28am
boroughonian wrote:
Wasn't it Livingstone that slowed the traffic down in the first place. I don't know how stationary traffic will mean a healthy city.
Subways are the future (ahem).

I'm not sure what you mean about Mayor Livingstone slowing the traffic down. Following the introduction of the congestion charge, car and bus journey times decreased while journey times in most other cities increased because of increasing congestion.

nb The alternative to 'increased traffic flow' of motorised vehicles isn't stationary traffic. It's modal shift and demand reduction, and stationary traffic is a temporary incentive to these ends. People stop using their cars when they can't get anywhere in them.
Thursday 9 March 2017 12.00pm
Rambling Phil wrote:
boroughonian wrote:
Wasn't it Livingstone that slowed the traffic down in the first place. I don't know how stationary traffic will mean a healthy city.
Subways are the future (ahem).

I'm not sure what you mean about Mayor Livingstone slowing the traffic down. Following the introduction of the congestion charge, car and bus journey times decreased while journey times in most other cities increased because of increasing congestion.

nb The alternative to 'increased traffic flow' of motorised vehicles isn't stationary traffic. It's modal shift and demand reduction, and stationary traffic is a temporary incentive to these ends. People stop using their cars when they can't get anywhere in them.

Purely anecdotal on my part, but I wasn't the only one complaining about the red light position on traffic lights lasting for a lot longer all of a sudden, I remember that being quite a topic on LBC at the time.

No, modal shift, by it's very description creates stationary traffic. The reason pollution increases is because traffic isn't moving enough, that's a fact.
The deterrent argument doesn't hold with me either, it's not working. I walked down Webber st all of my life, I now do so to get to work, the stationary traffic is unprecedented, it's backed up from Blackfriars rd to King James street every single morning.

There was once a bus lane in Blackfriars rd, now they are a joke, no way would I mess about with buses if I had to get to Farringdon or Walworth rd, is that the kind of deterrent you mean? They don't hardly move anymore and spew out the most rotten crap fpr our kids to breathe in.
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