Definitive rules on bikes?

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Monday 24 January 2005 1.07pm
I know that behaviour of cyclists was discussed at length on here, and certainly wouldn't want to open that up again - but I haven't been able to find a definite ruling on where you are/are not allowed to cycle on the riverfront. There are bits where it is clearly not ok, eg around Hays Galleria and then again just before Gabriel's Wharf, but a lot of it there's no clear signs etc. Cycling (very, very carefully) along yesterday we got dirty looks and comments from some walkers, even though we did dismount and walk at any points where it was signed. Does anyone know for certain what the rules are? Ta.
Monday 24 January 2005 1.12pm
Hi,
I tend to cycle nearly all the way along the river, right up from Shad Thames to Oxo Tower, before which I turn left onto the street behind Oxo leading to County Hall.
I think if you are cycling slowly and being careful and polite, as I usually try to, you should be fine. Obviously, on weekends things get very busy along the river during daytime, so not the best time to cycle.

Cycling IS allowed along most parts of the river though! Just try and be careful, not like the hord of chav kids usually tearing past me in Shad Thames on their BMX bikes.....

cheers
Kurt
Monday 24 January 2005 1.32pm
Claire T Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I know that behaviour of cyclists was discussed at
> length on here, and certainly wouldn't want to
> open that up again - but I haven't been able to
> find a definite ruling on where you are/are not
> allowed to cycle on the riverfront. There are
> bits where it is clearly not ok, eg around Hays
> Galleria and then again just before Gabriel's
> Wharf, but a lot of it there's no clear signs etc.
> Cycling (very, very carefully) along yesterday we
> got dirty looks and comments from some walkers,
> even though we did dismount and walk at any points
> where it was signed. Does anyone know for certain
> what the rules are? Ta.


This being South London, I reckon the rules are:

1. try not to hit anyone
2. do anything you like

Monday 24 January 2005 3.01pm
The map link seems to imply that none of the riverside pathway is for cycles.

{naughty Claire T!!!}

...if you press it, they will come.
Monday 24 January 2005 4.29pm
"The map link seems to imply that none of the riverside pathway is for cycles. "

Not quite.

The Sustrans map (and indeed, the map produced for the London Cycling Network) shows "recommended" cycle routes. It does not show where cycling is prohibited. It is perfectly permissible to cycle along most of the stretch of the river front, since it is designated as "shared use".

Small sections of the riverside route have been designated as pedestrians-only by the private companies that own (and operate) those areas. For example, the More London estate. However, so long as you ride considerately and safely, no one (except, perhaps, some old curmudgeons, who, frankly, should find something better to do....) is going to object.
Monday 24 January 2005 4.54pm
Martin Underwood Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Small sections of the riverside route have been
> designated as pedestrians-only by the private
> companies that own (and operate) those areas. For
> example, the More London estate. However, so long
> as you ride considerately and safely, no one
> (except, perhaps, some old curmudgeons, who,
> frankly, should find something better to do....)
> is going to object.

The original question was clearly based on concern for what was the right or wrong thing to do.

It wasn't asking for advice on how to cycle where you know you are not meant to, nor (as Claire specifically stated) was it meant to dig up old arguments about whether Jesus would have ridden a push bike (and, if he would have, whether he'd have worn a helmet and had insurance).

If you want to discuss this in Chatter, however, I'd love to join in.



...if you press it, they will come.
Monday 24 January 2005 5.28pm
Ahem... the original post, recreated here: "but I haven't been able to find a definite ruling on where you are/are not allowed to cycle on the riverfront"

Your post: "The map link seems to imply that none of the riverside pathway is for cycles. "... which is clearly wrong. The map SUGGESTS routes, but does not say where you are not ALLOWED to cycle. You ARE allowed to cycle thoughout most of the riverside route. There is an ongoing debate between the private landowners and the various cycle groups to permit cycling in the (very few) sections that are marked as "pedestrian only". You will also find that the security guards at More London are quite enlightened: they allow people to cycle along their stretch of riverside, so long as they do so SAFELY.

Not sure where your comments about Jesus come from; I've not thought about him since schooldays...
Monday 24 January 2005 5.50pm
Jesus gave up cycling for at least two reasons:
1) his sandals kept flopping off
2) his robes kept getting caught in the chain
...
3) he thought the safety crash hat made him look like a right plonker
4) there were no cycle paths in Jerusalem, he kept getting knocked over by carts travelling too fast, and not looking where they were going, and there were no designated cycle paths on the Jordan riverside walk...
Monday 24 January 2005 6.20pm
The Thames Path is a national trail, and according to its website it "follows a series of well-signed public rights of way along which people have a legal right of access. "

The following info is from their website (http://www.nationaltrails.gov.uk/thamespathframeset.htm):

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

An acorn, the symbol of Britain's National Trails, is used to guide your journey by marking the route in a variety of ways. It is used in conjunction with coloured arrows or the words 'footpath', 'bridleway' or 'byway' to indicate who can use a particular right of way.

The word 'footpath' and/or a yellow arrow indicates a path for use by walkers only and where, without the landowner's permission, it is illegal to cycle, ride a horse or drive a vehicle. Outside London, 83% of the Thames Path is footpath.

The word 'bridleway' and/or a blue arrow indicates a path which can be used by walkers, horseriders and cyclists but where, without the landowner's permission, it is illegal to drive any vehicle. Outside London, 6% of the Thames Path is bridleway.

The word 'byway' and/or a red arrow indicates a right of way which can be legally used by walkers, horseriders, cyclists and motorists. Outside London, 0.7% of the Thames Path is byway.

The Thames Path is signposted where it crosses roads and many rights of way using wooden or metal signposts. Elsewhere, waymark discs with acorns and coloured arrows are used on gates, stiles and waymark posts.

Guides:

Two Guide books will help your journey go all the more smoothly; the official Guide with its written route description and all the relevant colour maps, and the Thames Path Companion - the essential guide to facilities, services and accommodation along the trail. Both can be ordered from the National Trails Office on 01865 810224 or by using the order form provided (U.K. orders only). Outside the U.K. you can order the The Thames Path National Trail Guide and the Thames Path Companion via www.amazon.co.uk.

"The Thames Path National Trail Guide" by David Sharp, Aurum Press, 2001. Price 12.99 + 1.36 postage & packing.

"The Thames Path Companion" National Trails Office. Price 4.75 + 1.00 postage & packing.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

So, it looks as though youll have to buy (or borrow) the guide to get the definitive answer....
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