Thompson Local Directory

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Thursday 17 February 2005 11.29am
Has anyone else seen their attempts to deliver this unsolicited waste of paper? Rather then make any attempt to deliver to the door (which would be junk mail as its unsolicited?) they have left bundles of them outside the entrance to doors outside St Olaves Estate, Devon Mansions and other blocks and businesses along Tooley Street. Kindly, the local kids on my block have had a field day ripping up the catalogues.

Doesn't Thompson's action consist of illegal dumping?
Thursday 17 February 2005 11.52am
Let us know if it does, and then I can bring an action against the people who "publish" Metro (IMO, the biggest act of mass littering in recent years. And they do it every weekday.)

...if you press it, they will come.
Thursday 17 February 2005 12.27pm
The mass littering of the Metro is more the action of those who read it - but I do think the publishers should take more responsibility and try to get across to its readers that it's anti-social to scatter it across train seats and floors [20+ in the Northern Line carriage I was in this morning]. However that is going to be difficult when each paper passes through several pairs of hands before ending up in the LU operatives rubbish sack.



Edited 1 times. Last edit at 17 February 2005 12.29pm by janefs.
Thursday 17 February 2005 1.11pm
I think London Underground forced the publishers of Metro to put staples in the middle of it to cut down on litter.
i've always assumed LU lets them publish because theres a daily puff page about how wonderous LU is (with lotsa photo ops for beautiful Kenneth)

Jonathan - youre right though, Thompson probably are dumping.
I'll drop them a line and see how they respond.
Thursday 17 February 2005 2.48pm
Free newspapers put people out of work I've been told....as well as create litter...
Thursday 17 February 2005 3.18pm
Not entirely sure how free newspapers put people out of work. It could be argued they keep people IN work, since the free newspaper industry increases the availability of advertising space (thereby generating business for ad agencies, etc), has different circulation channels to paid-for newspapers, etc.

On the litter front, I once confronted a train operative at Aldgate station who was putting all the discarded Metros into a bag, and asked him whether they get dumped or recycled. Thankfully, they do get recycled by LUL (unless the bloke was lying to avoid a confrontation with a Grauniad reading eco-warrior....)
Thursday 17 February 2005 3.55pm
What worries me most about Metro, is that people think they are reading a newspaper when they read it.

But I suppose I have the same feeling about a lot of papers (and the ITV news)

[Just reread this, and I've got to say: "Julie, if you're here, you can see that I am really an old codger and it must have been my younger brother you met the other week"]

...if you press it, they will come.
Thursday 17 February 2005 4.41pm
Indeed, but unfortunately the whole newspaper readership has been moving towards short snappy soundbites for some time. As evidence, consider the ABCs of the UK national newspapers:

at one end of the scale....
Sun up 15%,
Daily Star up 12%
News of the world up 5%

...at the other end of the scale...
Times down 4%
Sunday Telegraph down 5%
Independent down 12%

People's daily lives are more fragmented than they were in the past. They tend not to sit and read a paper for an hour in one sitting any more; instead, they take fragments of news from many sources throughout the day. Newspapers such as Metro have captured the market in providing just enough editorial (however bland it may be) to satisfy a 5 minute flick-through on the Tube, whilst allowing advertisers to bombard them with images....
Thursday 17 February 2005 4.46pm
Ivanhoe Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> What worries me most about Metro, is that people
> think they are reading a newspaper when they read
> it.

ah, but they're actually reading a printed version of ceefax and ananova... I've seen stories lifted word for word from both ;-)


Thursday 17 February 2005 5.19pm
Martin Underwood Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Indeed, but unfortunately the whole newspaper
> readership has been moving towards short snappy
> soundbites for some time. As evidence, consider
> the ABCs of the UK national newspapers:
>
> at one end of the scale....
> Sun up 15%,
> Daily Star up 12%
> News of the world up 5%
>
> ...at the other end of the scale...
> Times down 4%
> Sunday Telegraph down 5%
> Independent down 12%
>
>
Martin, out of interest, where's that data from? What is the time period, and what are they comparing it against? Is it a monthly year on year comparison, or an annual year on year comparison? Or is it quarterly or something?

I just ask, because it seems very different to some data I have here in front of me which shows that all the dailies have seen a downturn in their circulation apart from the Financial Times, The Independent and The Times. (Source, ABC, October 2004 year on year comparison.) But that could have been an anomalous month.
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