Leaks or Rising Damp - I don't like wet floors!

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Friday 9 September 2005 6.13pm
Help - my mid terrace converted victorian/edwardian place has a soggy floor in the kitchen, bathroom and lower hall.
I've had someone round to check for rising damp and this was inconclusive - ended with the suggestion that I should get a plumber to check for leaking pipes first. Can anyone recommend a plumber who can do the necessary checks?

Monday 12 September 2005 9.41am
before you call a plumber, do you have a panel blocking your bath in? my sister in law lived in a converted victorian house, ground floor flat. After she moved in I went in to help her bathe ( she had parkinson's) a few days later I noticed a damp patch in her kitchen, cutting it short when the house had been converted the dorky workmen had not connected the bath outlet pipe correctly! a variety of specialists called in beforehand, rising damp, condensation were mentioned, fans to extract moisture etc., it was only when an old workman called in and suggested the bath was checked......
Monday 12 September 2005 1.32pm
thanks for that idea, i'll check it tonight, although i had to take the side panel off the bath a few months ago and I didn't see any obvious problems.
Wednesday 14 September 2005 11.27pm
Rising damp doesn't really exist.

1. Check for leaks in pipework - inlet and waste pipes. Outside drain pipes.

2. Think about condensation - do you have alot of hot showers or tumble driers?

3. Try turning the heating up.

Whatever you do, don't have your walls tanked. This will stop moisture from escaping through the walls, so will make the condensation problem WORSE!
Thursday 15 September 2005 3.22pm
in order to check for leaks, if there's nothing immediately visible is there any other way I can do any checks?
Thursday 15 September 2005 6.50pm
Turn off all the taps and listen for flowing water. In the good old days of Water Boards they would go round properties at dead of night and listen for flowing water (through use of a device) to try to detect leaks.

Turn all your taps off at the mains and go away for a fortnight.

What about a self-defrosting freezer? Or condensation? causing the problem.
Monday 19 September 2005 7.37pm
Hi Mapmaker
please don't shout or scream in disgust, but as an individual, i am a somewhat rubbishly inept female and haven't a clue where the mains is. I know how to isolate the kitchen taps and washing machine but can't see any other obvious places to try next. any ideas? (be gentle, I'm cowering already....)
Wednesday 21 September 2005 4.47pm

[Funnily, I thought chustler would be male...]

The mains tap may be in the cupboard under the sink. You ought to find out where it is, just in case there is a water disaster in your property!
Wednesday 21 September 2005 6.25pm
the really odd thing is - you're the second person now that thought chustler must be male - is there some secret code thing about names that i've just not got the hang of yet? I just figured my initial (C for Carol) and my surname would do the job nicely... obviously somewhat misleading!

re: the mains thing, the cupboard under the sink is where I can isolate the kitchen taps but not the rest - would it be a really silly thing to ask Thames Water the whereabouts of my mains?
Wednesday 21 September 2005 8.11pm
there could be a stop cock outside your house (probably front)
do you have a cellar? you could follow the pipes?
it could be in the under stairs cupboard?
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