Water Pressure

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Jac
Thursday 6 October 2005 1.47pm
Is anyone else having problems with low water pressure. At the moment we only seem able to use the shower at the top of our house (2nd floor) in the early evening. The rest of the time it wont work due to low pressure.
Thursday 6 October 2005 3.33pm
This is a huge problem across London.

Thames Water apparently started reducing pressure two-three years back to reduce leakage. It think it has been rolled out across London in stages, which may be why you are only just having problems. They are only, I understand, required to create enough pressure to reach something like the third floor. I also understand that Councils - I was working for one at the time - were given very little warning, and suddenly water was not reaching tower blocks, forcing them to buy expensive pumps.

But from what I recollect, you should be OK on the second floor, as I think that is part of the standard required. There will be someone in Southwark Housing who knows an awful lot about this problem, if someone can suggest who. Alternatively is there an Ofwat? It is a big issue and they should be able to help you.

Sarah





Thursday 6 October 2005 3.47pm
See this article from the Evening Standard

Thursday 6 October 2005 7.53pm
Sidhue,

Thanks for the link. That article reminds me of the bit in the film The Corporation which looks at how efficient private companies are at externalising threats to their profitability. Give them a requirement to reduce leakages, and what do they do? Invest some of the millions of pounds they've been making in profits over the years in reducing leaks and putting in new pipes? No, they reduce the water pressure and force the people who generate the profits for them (everyone) to spend more money on something they should already be getting for their money (adequate water pressure). You do have to admire market capitalism for its sheer audacity in passing the buck sometimes. A cynic would even suggest that Thames might have shares in the water pump company, so that they get even more profit out of the situation.

Time for some tighter regulation from OFWAT, or have Thames found a loophole that can't be plugged (sorry, bad pun) without primary legislation? If the latter, it is time to legislate.

The good news also comes from The Corporation - at the end, where the people in Bolivia rioted against the enforced privatisation of the water supply (it was even made illegal for people to collect rainwater) and took ownership of the water company back into the public's hands. Not that posting on this forum should be taken in any way, shape or form to be an incitement to riot, officer. Wouldn't want to be arrested under those terrorism laws...

(I'm sure Thames are spending some money on reducing leaks in the way I suggest, but clearly not enough.)





Edited 2 times. Last edit at 6 October 2005 8.02pm by Andrew.
SEH
Thursday 6 October 2005 8.41pm
Andrew, I so agree with you. I used to live in Notting Hill and every so often water would gush from the road in Holland Park Avenue as another crack appeared in the water main. The problem seemed to be moving up the hill. I lived in a flat (top floor) at the top of the hill and the water pressure was dreadful.

While I'm in rant mode, I rather assumed that the erratic water pressure was caused by work at one of the many building sites in the area (I live opposite Jac). Surely Thames Water would have reduced the pressure gradually in the hope that fewer people noticed?
Friday 7 October 2005 3.28am
Well, you DID clearly "glorify" a historical act of insurrection, so I figure you're good for at least 90 days as a guest at Hotel Blair-Clarke! :-)

Seriosuly though I agree with you - the abuses of "privatisation" are just becoming obscene. What is worse is that even more and more of the public infrastructure is getting handed over to these bandits in suits, despite widespread probelms we have seen with this model so far.


Andrew Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The good news also comes from The Corporation - at
> the end, where the people in Bolivia rioted
> against the enforced privatisation of the water
> supply (it was even made illegal for people to
> collect rainwater) and took ownership of the water
> company back into the public's hands. Not that
> posting on this forum should be taken in any way,
> shape or form to be an incitement to riot,
> officer. Wouldn't want to be arrested under those
> terrorism laws...
> Last edit at Thu 6 Oct 05 at 09.02PM by Andrew.


Friday 7 October 2005 11.31am
Isn't Thames Water owned by the French?

'Nuff said?
Jac
Friday 7 October 2005 12.18pm
Thanks for your replies. I have emailed Thames Water to see what they have to say. I shall post the response but note yheir web sites says it may take 7-10 days before I will get a reply. It seems ironic that I may be forced to have baths rather than the more water efficient shower especially as we are being urged to save water.
Sunday 9 October 2005 12.40am
When I phoned Thames water over a drop in water pressure on the first floor of my house they told me there was no lgal requirement for them to provide any specific pressure. As long as you can get a drip out they don't care.
Sunday 9 October 2005 7.41am
I thought the most interesting bit in that article in the ES was that Thames are promoting their sister company which supplies the pumps that customers need to buy to correct the pressure drop.
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