Spare keys exchange?

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Friday 10 March 2006 11.24am
Sooner or later I am going to lock myself out, and I don't have any logical local person to give my spare keys to.

I have looked at using a service called which stores your keys for 29 a year, then charges a 15 or 25 for a call-out. They say they will be with you in 1 hour in London. For everyone's peace of mind, they are very strict about not wanting to know your address, and insist on handing over your keys in a public place some distance from your home.

I might go with this service, but I also wondered if anyone here who lives close to Elephant and Castle is interested in doing a spare key exchange for free? As long as we don't actually know each other's address, I can't see any security problems. If one or other of us ever needed our spare keys, we could meet in a local spot for a handover, then again to hand them back.

Or is this a crazy hippy idea?

Friday 10 March 2006 11.42am
My late grandad, who was of the forgetful sort, kept a spare key in the lining of each of his coats, which he could then extract if he locked himself out. He claimed he had the idea from some equally forgetful elderly relative, who had keys sewn into his hatbands.
Friday 10 March 2006 12.18pm
Only once have I locked myself out and getting back in was such a hassle I decided to tighten
the Cylinder rim lock (Yale) so that in order to shut the door I have to insert the key, turn it and shut.
The door cannot be shut from the outside without inserting the key, nor from the inside without
turning the catch. Even slamming it won't close the door. So I can't leave without the key other than by
leaving the door open - and surely no-one is going to do that! I also have a quality mortice lock.

I did research picking locks on and practised on an
old yale but couldn't turn it. Probably need a proper set of tools for the job.

As for the service. What's to stop the person meeting you from making copies of the
keys on the way to you and then following you home and returning at a later date.
I'm sure the people they employ are of the traffic warden type. I wouldn't trust them.
Friday 10 March 2006 12.42pm
You wouldn't trust them? Come off it, this is their business, their livelihood. I hardly think they would jeopardise that by robbing a client's house.
Friday 10 March 2006 12.49pm
Royal Mail's business if the delivery of post, but that doesn't stop their employees nicking my DVDs...
Friday 10 March 2006 1.08pm
Given that it costs 29 a year and 25 a call out and assuming you don't lock yourself out more than once every year or two, you'd be as well to not pay anything and just put the number of a reputable 24hour lock-smith in your phone. Then you just need to make sure you don't lose your phone!

I've also just discovered that my insurance covers me for calling out a lock-smith so in theory it should be free (less excess I suppose).
Friday 10 March 2006 1.47pm
What about leaving a spare key at work. It does the trick for me.
Friday 10 March 2006 2.00pm
My office is only open office hours, so I locked myself out at night or at the weekend, I would be even worse off.
Friday 10 March 2006 3.16pm
change the lock (or door) to one which you can only close and lock from the outside with the use of a key, then you'll always have to have a key with you when you leave the house. This works fine, until you actually lose your keys, whilst out of the house.
Friday 10 March 2006 3.20pm
...which is what did happen to me a year ago after my bag was stolen. Terrible business.
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