Malfunctioning cashpoint in SE1! Free money!

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Thursday 17 January 2008 5.43pm
One of the Lloyds TSB cashpoints in the Elephant and Castle shopping centre has been dispensing an extra 20 with every withdrawal! It was malfunctioning from yesterday evening until some time today, when it was taken out of service.

We were leaving bingo last night when a friend made a withdrawal and noticed the bonus twenty, so I tried and got the same. I popped back later and did it again, and it worked again. I was surprised that the word hadn't got round. Was deserted. We didn't win anything at bingo, but got a windfall anyway.

Will be interesting to see if I am required to repay. Will keep an eye on Crimewatch.

Am I a bad person?
Thursday 17 January 2008 9.29pm
...you are not a bad person.

The cash machine is loaded with "cassettes" of cash - in 10 and 20 pound denominations. The cassettes are loaded locally at the Securicor facility at 9 Elms.

So, either the 10 pound cassette was incorrectly loaded with 20s - or a 20 pound cassette was incorrectly placed in the 10 pound slot.

TSB will be keen to get it's money back - and posting here will confirm that you obtained incorrect monies from the "faulty" machine.

The bank will be aware of the problem and will, normally, pursue accounts (like yours) that do not balance.

Here are some folks who had similar experiences to you...

Lucky punter 1

Lucky punter 2

Lucky punter 3

I understand that it's TSBs and Securicor's foul up but there is no "free money" as you state when you "popped back later and did it again".
Thursday 17 January 2008 9.43pm
Andrew H wrote:

Am I a bad person?

Why are you asking?!

I think taking money which isn't yours (and you know it isn't) and not giving it back, and then returning to do it again isn't too great...
Thursday 17 January 2008 10.39pm
Thanks Boss St Bloke, very interesting, and I think you are right about the 10/20 note issue, it makes sense. I do fully expect to have the "free" money debited from my account in time. It is just entertaining and amusing when a bank makes a foolish mistake like this.

My thread title was tongue-in-cheek, I guess that rarely comes across in this medium.
Friday 18 January 2008 6.27am
Less of the moralising tone. Wouldn't this be the same banks that are currently in court fighting a rear guard action over exorbitant fees i.e. helping themselves to monies that were not theirs? The thing that sickens me about the bank charges is that they hit struggling people far more than people who are much more able to afford them.

Once again: 'To them that have shall be given more; and them that don't even the little that they do have shall be taken away.
Friday 18 January 2008 1.15pm
JimG wrote:
Less of the moralising tone. Wouldn't this be the same banks that are currently in court fighting a rear guard action over exorbitant fees i.e. helping themselves to monies that were not theirs? The thing that sickens me about the bank charges is that they hit struggling people far more than people who are much more able to afford them.

Yes but they signed up to terms and conidtions when they opened their accounts and the fees would have made clear. If you later become "sickened" by the fees because you haven't managed your account then who's fault is that? Certainly not the banks.

What would you do in the situation described by Andrew H - would you keep quiet?

And what's with the patronising "Less of the moralising tone"? They seem to differ from yours that's all.
Friday 18 January 2008 3.40pm
As an 18 year old student signing up for your first bank account I do not believe that people look in detail at the terms and conditions. If people did this then that is how banks would market their accounts rather than on dubious 'freebies' such as 30 or a free train pass. The point of the current court case is that the terms and conditions, although signed up to, are potentially illegal.

I have not paid bank charges for years but was hit by a bank increasing my exit fee from a mortgage - later repaid in full as the bank was identified as trying to pull a fast one (although initially the argument of terms and conditions was tried by the greedy bank).

Apologies for the 'patronising tone' having re-read your posting I would perhaps change this to less of the priggish tone - I am sure you did not mean to but you sound a little like a prefect/head boy. Surely your comments about 'taking money that is not yours and returning to do the same' can be equally applied to the banks sharp practices that has led to them paying back millions/billions(?) of stolen mortgage fees and fighting tooth and nail to avoid doing the same regarding bank charges.
Friday 18 January 2008 5.05pm
I'd pocket the money and say sucks boo to the bank who are ripping everyone off on a daily basis to the extent of millions of quid. How many people used the machine? If it's 20 or 30, then they've lost at most 600. Sorry I cant get excited.
Friday 18 January 2008 5.36pm
No. No. And, no.

If anyone signs up to anything financial (loan, bank a/c, whatever) without reading the terms and conditions, then I'd assume that they are either so rich that they don't care or that they are being very very careless and are unlikely to deserve much sympathy if they lose some money because of it.

...if you press it, they will come.
Friday 18 January 2008 5.48pm
I partially agree with you Ivanhoe (caveat emptor and all that) but if it was really this clear then why is there a court case? And why have such large sums already been paid back by the banks??
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