tunes

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Saturday 22 May 2010 8.20pm
We had a dinner party last night, and when it got to the stage of silly games, someone suggested naming songs/tunes with days of the week in the title. It passed around the table, one person after the other, and when someone got stuck they were out of the game. At first the songs flowed at a rate of knots; 'Monday Monday,' Ruby Tuesday,' etc. etc. Gradually, one by one, people dropped out and I eventually won the game. No big deal. As the oldest around the table I had more to draw upon. However, at the end of the game it was noticed that nowhere had there been a song/tune with either Wedensday or Thursday in the title. This led to a second game of who could name one. By this time the wine had taken over and we would have struggled to remember our own names, let alone song titles. But, even this morning, in a state of unwanted sobriety, I couldn't think of one.
Over to you, dear friends.
Sunday 23 May 2010 6.30am
Wednesday morning 3a.m. Simon and Garfunkel.
Sunday 23 May 2010 6.32am
Wednesday morning 3a.m. Simon and Garfunkel.
Thursday's child. David Bowie
Sunday 23 May 2010 8.55am
Thanks, TP.
(You must accept that you will now never be invited to one of my 'do's,' coz you're too clever by half!)
Sunday 23 May 2010 6.40pm
chalkey wrote:
Thanks, TP.
(You must accept that you will now never be invited to one of my 'do's,' coz you're too clever by half!)
Not as clever as you, (or I), might think Chalkey.
I was inveigled into a pub quiz last week and the quiz master did a round where he played some tunes, and said that every one had a bird, (feathered), in the title or in the artists names.
I got The Eagles, and Billy Swan, and a couple of others, but then he played an instrumental version of "White Cliffs of Dover"
I seized my pencil and wrote bluebird, as in "there'll be bluebirds over etc. etc." only to be shot down in flames when he said that the bird in question was dove, from the title, "White Cliffs of DOVEr."
Now can I come?
Monday 24 May 2010 7.03am
I would have given you the point, Tom. I've always known the tune's full title as, 'They'll be bluebirds over....ect' and not just, 'White cliffs of Dover.' And I'm sure I'm right.
We had one little stewards enquiry at our bash the other night when someone insisted on the Beatles song, 'Wednesday morning,' (at five o'clock as the day begins etc.) At first they wouldn't accept that the actual title is, 'She's leaving home.' I had to dig out my 'Sgt.Pepper' album to settle the argument.
By the way, Tom. Was he a realtion of yours. (Tee-hee.)
Monday 24 May 2010 6.13pm
You're right, Chalkey. The title is There'll be Blue Birds Over the White Cliffs of Dover, though of course there never have been what with us not having bluebirds. The song was written by Americans. Radio 4 did a thing on it not long ago.
Monday 24 May 2010 7.28pm
chalkey wrote:
By the way, Tom. Was he a realtion of yours. (Tee-hee.)
First of all, write out 100 hundred times "I MUST learn how to spell relation."

Second of all, related to an NCO? All my relatives were captains upward aside from my old Dad who was a trooper in The Royal Armoured Corps, and my son's German father-in-law, an unteroffizier, (sergeant), in the SS, (nobody's perfect.)
Monday 24 May 2010 8.50pm
A hundred lines just for a typo? Blimey, Tom, I think you're closer to the SS than you let on!
Monday 24 May 2010 9.48pm
chalkey wrote:
A hundred lines just for a typo? Blimey, Tom, I think you're closer to the SS than you let on!

My hands are up Chalkey, I was a bit harsh there.

On the SS front, it was hilarious at my son's wedding in Germany.
My Dad was was rattling on with comments like, "You started it" à la Monty Python.
Rolf, my daughter-in-law's Dad was telling my Dad, in cut glass English, "If Hitler hadn't sent us into Russia, we would have finished it too!"
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