English as she is writ

Join in these discussions today! Log in or register.
Pages:  1 2 Next
Current: 1 of 2
Sunday 10 April 2011 8.22pm
Am I turning into Victor Meldrew, or maybe a pedant?
Can I be the only one who seethes when I read, "He should/would of, instead of he should/would have."
or "Over their, instead of over there." or "They took there shoes off, as opposed to their shoes."
Monday 11 April 2011 6.50am
A good one beetroot, but I remain unconvinced, I feel that there is no hope for me on this subject, but I appreciate your input.
Monday 11 April 2011 7.05am
Debrajoan wrote:
A good one beetroot, but I remain unconvinced, I feel that there is no hope for me on this subject, but I appreciate your input.


I'm with you on this one dj, but had to smile at this.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4vf8N6GpdM&feature=related
Monday 11 April 2011 3.14pm
It's always risky to complain about grammar and punctuation as all your posts will be scrutinised for errors or typos. I was going to comment on the punctuation in the first post but maybe I'm seeing things.
Monday 11 April 2011 3.51pm
Examples of the one that does bug me these days are
'most deadliest' and 'least nastiest' instead of 'most deadly' and 'least nasty'.
I know my grammar is far from perfect but some of the basic ones do bug me. I think though it's always important to be sensitive to the communication. People have posted on this forum about some serious issues they need help with only to have their spelling corrected. Responses like that are worse than any writing flaws could be.
Monday 11 April 2011 8.07pm
I'm sure I've murdered the English language many times over with my postings, because they are mostly written in haste and never previewed. I therefore have no right to be pedantic about other peoples mistakes. However, I still wince at certain things such as ill-written signage e.g., a recent sign outside a local shop undergoing refurbishment which read:
'Work in progress. Sorry if youve got trouble getting passed.'
I left school at the age of fifteen with the bare basics in education. If needed, I have that as an excuse for my bad grammar, spelling, diction, ect. However, my pet hate, which I find inexcusable when uttered by university educated fanancial correspondents on radio and t.v., is the term: 'Half a per cent.'
On these occasions I do become a downright pedant.
'Half of one per cent.' 'One half per cent.' 'Half a percentage point.' There are so many ways to say it correctly. Nine times out of ten, they choose the wrong one.
Tuesday 12 April 2011 12.10am
chalkey wrote:
I'm sure I've murdered the English language many times over with my postings, because they are mostly written in haste and never previewed. I therefore have no right to be pedantic about other peoples mistakes. However, I still wince at certain things such as ill-written signage e.g., a recent sign outside a local shop undergoing refurbishment which read:
'Work in progress. Sorry if youve got trouble getting passed.'
I left school at the age of fifteen with the bare basics in education. If needed, I have that as an excuse for my bad grammar, spelling, diction, ect. However, my pet hate, which I find inexcusable when uttered by university educated fanancial correspondents on radio and t.v., is the term: 'Half a per cent.'

Watch out for phoney the proof reader chalkey!
No comma after signage, youve instead of you've, (unless that was part of the signage mistake). ect instead of etc. Fanancial instead of financial.
There is a business in Pancras Road N.W.1 that according to the sign above the store, sells radiator's, two premises along,another store apparently sells mirror's!
Still, I cannot boast of always being right, a Texan got in my cab years ago and boomed, "Take me to the Tar Hotel son."
Assuming that he meant The Tara in Kensington I took him there.
On arrival he enquired, "Where's the goddam river?"
Apparently Tar is Texan for Tower, he wanted The Tower Hotel by Tower Bridge!
Tuesday 12 April 2011 8.00am
Oh dear Debrajoan, count yourself lucky that Mickey Salt isn't posting here very much any more. He was an absolute poster boy for appalling spelling and punctuation. However, although I've an MA in English and have an English professor husband, we both feel that if people are going to be bashful about their spelling or grammar and therefore don't post at all, we'd all be losers. And certainly this Forum is a place for adding one's two bits, it's not a job application! As for the journalists...their sound bites are enough to make you blow a gasket. "In the future going forward", "Different to..."...but the Professor says we're being too picky and language is a live thing...and he's a bloody professor so I guess we should defer..
Tuesday 12 April 2011 8.34am
The missing comma was part of the sign, Tom. The rest is my usual hastilly and carelessly written English.
I've dabbled in hobby writing over the years and although I consider myself a passable raconteur, I have a natural disability when typing. I suffer from, 'fat finger' syndrome. Being a cockney, I also have to work hard at my dyed-in-the-wool habit of writing English as I speak it.
I've often read through something half a dozen times before spotting what should have been a glaring grammatical error. One that immediately springs to mind is a passage from a story 'what I writ,' some years ago about my introdustion to angling. I was ten years old when I caught my first fish on rod and line. It was a little roach.

'Small it may have been, but it had all the characterisitcs of its kind. Its silvery-blue flanks flashed in the sunlight, and its orangey-red fins seemed to glow like fire. My heart was still thumping with excitement as I slipped it carefully in to my keep net.'

I didn't really slip my heart in to my keep net. I'm not in to open heart surgery, particularly on myself.

One the English teachers often quote as an example of a grammatical trap is: 'He opened the door in his dressing gown.'

A dressing gown with a door in it? Mmmm. Could be useful.
Pages:  1 2 Next
Current: 1 of 2

To post a message, please log in or register..

Keep up with SE1 news

We have three email newsletters for you to choose from: