Good English food with strange name....

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Thursday 1 September 2011 1.49pm
Hello everybody!

Today at my work I have asked for a desert and I have been told:

We have "spotted dick with warm white cream".

I am not English so I though they were making fun of me. Than I noticed it was on the black board..

In fact it was a delicious sponge cake (half a sphere) with raisins and custard.

Is that the official name? Are there other crazy names for other dishes?
Thursday 1 September 2011 5.46pm
That is it's proper name, and if it's made properly it's great.
Thursday 1 September 2011 7.50pm
The original 'Spotted Dick,' wasn't sponge. It was made with suet. It was pretty heavy stuff. (You wouldn't want to drop one on your foot.) The custard made it more than palatable though.

I recently had bread and butter pudding for the first time in donkey's years. OMG! Forgot how good it was.
(Lashings of cream on top of course. De regeur!!!)
Thursday 1 September 2011 8.11pm
Bangers and Mash..... Sausages and Mashed Potato.
Devils on Horseback..... Prunes or Dates stuffed with cheese or chutney and wrapped in bacon.
Angels on Horseback... same deal but with oysters instead of dates or prunes.
Then there is the politically incorrect "N's" word in a snow storm, prunes in rice.
Plus my old Dad used to call rice, Chinese wedding cake.
Thursday 1 September 2011 11.21pm
Yup, with you on the 'Chinese wedding cake,' Tom. But I knew it as when referred to rice pudding.
Thursday 1 September 2011 11.31pm
chalkey wrote:
The original 'Spotted Dick,' wasn't sponge. It was made with suet.

Correct! In fact I think it wasn't sponge. It was very dense and consistent in texture. Greasy? ... But very tasty.

Tom, thanks. I had Bangers and mash but I haven't tried anything like those Horsebacks. Are those mama cooking things or I can try them somewhere?
Friday 2 September 2011 12.03am
Pigs in blankets......Little sausages wrapped in bacon. (A traditional extra with Christmas dinner.)

My grandmother used to make a thick gravy which she called, 'Charlie Chaplin.' Never knew why.
I can only guess that one of her kids, (My mum, aunt or uncle,) once aksed what it was and she couldn't be bothered to explain and so said the first thing that came in to her head.
Friday 2 September 2011 6.19am
orione wrote:

Tom, thanks. I had Bangers and mash but I haven't tried anything like those Horsebacks. Are those mama cooking things or I can try them somewhere?

My Mum did the devils on horseback occasionally, I had the angels on horseback in Baton Rouge, Louisiana years ago. Chalkey, you're right, it was probably rice pudding that my Dad referred to.
One we forgot, Bubble and Squeak, mashed up potato mixed with cabbage Orione.
You may get the angels things in an up-market diner in the West End, but you'll have to scrutinise menus to find them.
Friday 2 September 2011 6.31am
No one's mentioned "toad in the hole" yet. One of my favourite crazy English dishes.

Sausages baked in batter, which rises around them into a Yorkshire pudding. Best with boiled spuds (potatoes) and veggies and lashings of gravy.

I have no idea, by the way, where "toad in the hole" comes from - the dish or the name!
Friday 2 September 2011 7.11am
I have to try them one by one.

For fun I will try Roast. They say they promote british food. Lets see their face when I ask. :))

Once in a pub I had "faggots". (For which name I am aware of one single meaning...)

The dish was very good. Heavy..
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