Good English food with strange name....

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chalkey Friday 2 September 2011 8.42am
Mmmmm, Faggotts and peas pudding from the 'Hole-in-the-wall,' Dunton Road. (1960's.)

I had bubble and squeak last night, cooked to a Geno di Campo recipe. Smashing!

Two of my old Nan's specialities were Corned beef and tomato pie and oinion and bacon pudding. The latter was like trying to eat a medicine ball!

Many years ago our local chippy sold little round parcels of fish fried in batter. They went by the unappetizing name of, 'Skate's eyeballs.'
jasmine Saturday 3 September 2011 2.44pm
Made bread and butter pudding for my kids this week, they went so impressed! I loved it though. They love toad in the hole, bubble and squeak and jam ropy poly, rock cakes and drop scones were a hit too. Next up I'm gonna try them on bread pudding and jam cat pudding. That'll worry them :o)
chalkey Sunday 4 September 2011 11.12am
When my wife makes bread and butter pudding, she spreads marmalade on the bread before cooking. It gives it a nice, piquant little kick.
Mini Haha Tuesday 6 September 2011 2.36pm
What about Eton Mess? Yum!
ADT Wednesday 7 September 2011 1.40pm
Rock buns. Little cakes using a kind of scone mix with fruit and spices. No rocks.

Shoo fly pie. US rather than English in origins, but a favourite when I was a child. The ingredients include neither shoes or flies. It is a rich sweet tart with a filling made with molasses or dark brown sugar.
lisaheader Thursday 8 September 2011 9.48am
You have pretty nice names of desserts :D Hope I can give them a try when I come to visit London.

chavender Monday 31 October 2011 7.19am
Thames mud was our school name for chocolate sauce, frogspawn was what we called tapioca pudding, and bleeding man's head was steamed pudding with jam.

Then there's Stargazy pie, a pie with whole fish, I think small mackerel, with their heads sticking out and 'gazing up' through the pastry, a Cornish speciality.

I bought some medlars from Borough Market and roasted them and had to throw them away because they were disgusting. I then discovered they should have been 'bletted', i.e. laid in a cool dark place and ripened for a few weeks before cooking, so 'bletted medlars' - another English dish.

http://barcelonavisit.com
Holiday flat in Barcelona
Debrajoan Monday 31 October 2011 5.40pm
chavender wrote:
I then discovered they should have been 'bletted', i.e. laid in a cool dark place and ripened for a few weeks before cooking, so 'bletted medlars' - another English dish.

Strangely enough, blet is French for over-ripe.
chavender Monday 31 October 2011 5.58pm
apparently when bletted they do look a bit musty and disgusting but taste very good. Seems that you need some bletted but a few unbletted to make medlar jelly

http://barcelonavisit.com
Holiday flat in Barcelona
Tom Pepper Tuesday 1 November 2011 4.58pm
chavender wrote:

I bought some medlars from Borough Market and roasted them and had to throw them away because they were disgusting. I then discovered they should have been 'bletted', i.e. laid in a cool dark place and ripened for a few weeks before cooking, so 'bletted medlars' - another English dish.

As a black cab driver, I revel in our well deserved reputation of "knowing everything.", (Sometimes.)
I have been asked "How many Thai baht to the pound?"
(I was around five out on that one.)
"What time is it now in Brisbane?"
(I got that spot on, having a son there.)
But I had to admit defeat with these medlars, I had to google the word to establish what they are, and what they look like.
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