Cannabis spray

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Monday 5 June 2006 8.52am
Unusual request I know, my sister has M. E and suffered for many many years from it. Someone has told her that there was someone with the same complaint who got great relief from the pain by using a cannabis spray.

I have gone on net and only find basic information on the same , unless i start to grow some in me garden!
Has any one else heard about it? just found a link, but am unable to access as it is a restricted site via work p.c
Monday 5 June 2006 2.25pm
This from netdoctor.co.uk, November 2005
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NHS to prescribe cannabis spray

A pain relieving cannabis-based mouth spray will be available on the NHS to multiple sclerosis (MS) sufferers for the first time, it was announced today (November 2005).

The spray, called Sativex, contains two chemicals found in cannabis known as tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol.

The Home Office has said the drug, which is yet to be licensed in the UK, can be imported for individual patient's use.

A doctor would have to take responsibility for prescribing the drug and it will only be available under a licence from the Home Office.

Sativex will have to be imported from Canada - where it is already licensed for use - for each individual patient.

The government has asked the Commission on Human Medicines to monitor the safety of the drug, which was refused a licence from regulators last year due to lack of clinical data.

A previous study by the Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery in Liverpool concluded that Sativex reduced pain and sleep disturbance.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) said it did not object to the use of the spray.

The regulatory body said in a statement: "Under current regulations the MHRA may only refuse an application to import an unlicensed medicine into the UK to meet the needs of a particular patient if there are overriding concerns about the product's safety or quality.

"Lack of proven efficacy is not a ground for refusing the import."

GW Pharmaceuticals - the company that produces the drug - has said it will continue to seek a UK licence for the pain-relieving spray.

About 85,000 people in the UK have MS, which causes a range of symptoms including abnormal fatigue, lack of balance and coordination, slurred speech and pain.

Commenting on today's news, Mike O'Donovan, chief executive of the Multiple Sclerosis Society called the decision a "move in the right direction".

"We believe there is now good evidence that cannabis-derived medicine can relieve distressing symptoms like spasticity and pain in MS," he said.

"Many people do not find available treatments effective and will now have the opportunity to try a new drug which could significantly improve their quality of life. We very much hope it will not be long before it is licensed for NHS prescription."


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and from the Telegraph, also November 2005
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MS patients to be given cannabis spray drug
By Celia Hall, Medical Editor
(Filed: 16/11/2005)



A cannabis-based medicine is being made available to British patients with multiple sclerosis for the first time following approval from the Home Office for its importation from Canada.

The oral spray derived from the cannabis plant will be available on prescription for around 4 a day. Research indicates that it relieves the pain and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis.


Sativex will be available on private presciption
Although the drug, called Sativex, has no licence for use in Britain, and despite its refusal of a licence by the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) last year, Paul Goggins, the Home Office Minister, has agreed to its use in special circumstances.

The medicine can only be obtained from doctors who have a licence for the controlled drug from the Home Office. They will prescribe it on a named patient basis, the system available for the use of unlicensed medicines.

It is expected that people with MS will have to buy Sativex on private prescriptions. It would only be available on the NHS if a trust specifically agreed to its use for an individual patient.

Mike O'Donovan, the chief executive of the Multiple Sclerosis Society said yesterday: "This is a move in the right direction. We believe there is now good evidence that cannabis-derived medicine can relieve distressing symptoms like spasticity and pain in MS.

"Many people do not find available treatments effective and will now have the opportunity to try a new drug which could significantly improve their quality of life. We very much hope it will not be long before it is licensed for NHS prescription."

A Department of Health spokesman said: "It is vital that we ensure that drugs are safe before they are used in the NHS. It is for this reason that Jane Kennedy, the health minister, has referred Sativex to the Commission on Human Medicines to determine its safety, quality and efficacy."

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hope that helps....

Mark.
Tuesday 6 June 2006 11.17am
It helps a lot...thank you...:-)
Thursday 8 June 2006 4.35pm
Hi Jan,

My mother has MS and was one of the people trialling this spray - official licence from the Home Office and the rest!

Unfortunately all it did was make her feel very unwell. No difference to pain levels or spasm. She didn't meet anyone else on the trial who had found it a success either, but I believe the overall results were quite encouraging.
Thursday 8 June 2006 5.09pm
Helen, thats a shame about your Mum, i wonder if the ' real ' thing would be any better? my sister could make tea from the 'erb itself, or take up smoking! can you buy seeds? I have a bit of dirt out the back...:-)

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