Baby P

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Monday 17 November 2008 7.24pm
I have been trying not to think about this poor little mite, having read additional witness reports these atrocities go straight to my heart. If the perpertrators of this violent murder don't get sentenced to at least 30 years the same as the Krays/Ian Bradey etc., Lets sack ther Judges or alter the law so any one else carrying out such violence to a defenceless child never sees the light of day. Or ensure their picture is printed on the front page of the prisoners own newspaper.

We as a nation scream our heads off about conditions in orphanages accross the world, chinas one child policy, yet we cant stop what is going on under our nose despite Haringey have a large budget.
Monday 17 November 2008 11.10pm
In short, I used to work in a world reknown centre looking after extremely ill patients. We treated at least 500 patients a year but there was only one social worker. Many patients there also required psychological support as a result of aggressive treatment and complications in addition to social issues but none received any. This is because counselor and psychologist are thought of as being not important.

I just watched the news and one ex-Haringey social worker commented that managers preferred to give the job to someone who will listen (i.e. obey) but not questioning any potential risk otherwise they would want you out. This is epidemic and it is the reality. Despite my senior position, my determination to fight and 'do' the right thing cost me my health amongst other things, bullying. Managers should be made accountable in the court of law including serving upto 30 years, not those who provide direct care to the patients, in this case the social worker. With more managers like this, we get more staff with the least experience being employed and promoted by them. All this appraisals and evidence of good practice can be made up and signed for by the managers if they like you. The care pathway and the paper work involved in caring for a patient are much more complex than anyone who works outside these fields could imagine.

I have known managers wore their lovely suits and sat in air-con offices while patients swimming in their own sweat on the ward. It didn't occur to them that this would serve as a breeding ground for bacteria to grow. I have to admit that their offices have windows while the ward I worked in, we were not allowed to open the window (this was for the right reason though).

When it comes to caring for people, we cannot let managers who have no experience in caring for people to run the place. Clueless managers prefer to pick clueless workers so that clueless workers will not pick up what they don't know. This is an epidemic. Until the culture of creating more and more intimidating managers, this will continue. Baby P is one of the many who suffered under the poor system. When the Haringey manager refused to apologise, refused to review their practice, it really shows her lack of empathy and hence the lack of experience in caring for the community she serves.
Monday 17 November 2008 11.10pm
In short, I used to work in a world reknown centre looking after extremely ill patients. We treated at least 500 patients a year but there was only one social worker. Many patients there also required psychological support as a result of aggressive treatment and complications in addition to social issues but none received any. This is because counselor and psychologist are thought of as being not important.

I just watched the news and one ex-Haringey social worker commented that managers preferred to give the job to someone who will listen (i.e. obey) but not questioning any potential risk otherwise they would want you out. This is epidemic and it is the reality. Despite my senior position, my determination to fight and 'do' the right thing cost me my health amongst other things, bullying. Managers should be made accountable in the court of law including serving upto 30 years, not those who provide direct care to the patients, in this case the social worker. With more managers like this, we get more staff with the least experience being employed and promoted by them. All this appraisals and evidence of good practice can be made up and signed for by the managers if they like you. The care pathway and the paper work involved in caring for a patient are much more complex than anyone who works outside these fields could imagine.

I have known managers wore their lovely suits and sat in air-con offices while patients swimming in their own sweat on the ward. It didn't occur to them that this would serve as a breeding ground for bacteria to grow. I have to admit that their offices have windows while the ward I worked in, we were not allowed to open the window (this was for the right reason though).

When it comes to caring for people, we cannot let managers who have no experience in caring for people to run the place. Clueless managers prefer to pick clueless workers so that clueless workers will not pick up what they don't know. This is an epidemic. Until the culture of creating more and more intimidating managers, this will continue. Baby P is one of the many who suffered under the poor system. When the Haringey manager refused to apologise, refused to review their practice, it really shows her lack of empathy and hence the lack of experience in caring for the community she serves.
Monday 17 November 2008 11.27pm
In short, I used to work in a world reknown centre looking after extremely ill patients. We treated at least 500 patients a year but there was only one social worker. Many patients there also required psychological support as a result of aggressive treatment and complications in addition to social issues but none received any. This is because counselor and psychologist are thought of as being not important.

I just watched the news and one ex-Haringey social worker commented that managers preferred to give the job to someone who will listen (i.e. obey) but not questioning any potential risk otherwise they would want you out. This is epidemic and it is the reality. Despite my senior position, my determination to fight and 'do' the right thing cost me my health amongst other things, bullying. Managers should be made accountable in the court of law including serving upto 30 years, not those who provide direct care to the patients, in this case the social worker. With more managers like this, we get more staff with the least experience being employed and promoted by them. All this appraisals and evidence of good practice can be made up and signed for by the managers if they like you. The care pathway and the paper work involved in caring for a patient are much more complex than anyone who works outside these fields could imagine.

I have known managers wore their lovely suits and sat in air-con offices while patients swimming in their own sweat on the ward. It didn't occur to them that this would serve as a breeding ground for bacteria to grow. I have to admit that their offices have windows while the ward I worked in, we were not allowed to open the window (this was for the right reason though).

When it comes to caring for people, we cannot let managers who have no experience in caring for people to run the place. Clueless managers prefer to pick clueless workers so that clueless workers will not pick up what they don't know. This is an epidemic. Until the culture of creating more and more intimidating managers, this will continue. Baby P is one of the many who suffered under the poor system. When the Haringey manager refused to apologise, refused to review their practice, it really shows her lack of empathy and arrogance hence the lack of experience in caring for the community she serves.
Monday 17 November 2008 11.38pm
Sorry Jan. My laptop freezes every now and then and I ended up pressing 'post message' more than I should when it eventually worked.
Tuesday 18 November 2008 8.46am
Kaptau love, one post from you is good..three wonderful!

The managers from any company always prefer to surround themselves with sycophants..or yes men.Or as I believe Goerring said in court when questioned about his willingness to serve Hitler..'show me a No man who is alive!'
Change the life part to Job and there you have it.

In my time I have had to way up the pros and cons of keeping my mouth shut in the office. But hand on my heart I could never live with myself if I stood back and said nothing about this child or any one else who was at risk from being ignored by the so called professional staff surrounding them.

I can imagine your kindness and determination in fighting with managerial staff and despair over the loss of staff like your self in the medical profession.
Any senior managers would gang up on anyone who does not toe the line therefore threatening their well paid positions, using the threat of a) being moved...b) bad appraisal...3) first in line for redundancy.

I agree about the Manager and 30 years, and Shoesmiths attitude is beyond me.

The bit about Managers sitting in airconditioned offices while their patients sweltered hit a nerve with me.
My seriously hill husband was in st thomas's in july 2006, they placed him in a bed right near the window over looking the river, but the sun streamed down on his head, I went to pull the blinds down..they did not work! the staff did not seem concerned, I asked him to be moved into a vacant bed opposite..no point she smiled sweetly...the sun will move later anyway...so I got to work with large sheets of newspaper stuck on window to shield him. Standing on the window ledge it struck me..here we are facing the seat on democracy, the place where decisions are made that affect all of us, and me a doddery old woman standing on a window ledge in the 21st century in a flagship hospital trying to stop the sun blazing down on a dying man. He died three days later.

Two weeks after this with our hearts still grieving, my mother had a stroke. She lost her voice seemed confused etc., admitted to queen elizabeths..the ward was unbearably hot, there was no air conditioning we opened the window but due to the design of the hospital not much air came in. One of my brothers took a sophisticated gadget in to measure the air in the ward..can't remember what exactly it was..temp 30plus!

We were told that she would have speech therapy and would be tube fed after a certain time. The speech therapist told her to practice mouse like noises..eeek..
The therapist told us her hours had been cut down..
Some arrogant young doctor told us that my mum was technically dying anyway so no p.e.g feed would be used.
My brother insisted on a meeting with all concerned including palliative care nurse , also some american cost cutter bought in to save the NHS from wasting money on pensioners..I said to let someone die of starvation and dehydration was barbaric and inhumane..the p.care nuse assured me it was ' a gentle way of dying' it may well be if patient was comatose not if she's sitting up in bed laughing..Even if the patient appeared asleep etc., who is to say what level of consciousness they may have? My brother threatened to sell his house and take the NHS to court unless they carried out the p.e.g. tube insertion..they changed their minds..

As I appear to be indulging in my favourite occupation..i.e. waffling I will stop this subject. suffice to say that was over 2 years ago august 2006...it's now November 2008 and she is still with us thanks to the devotion of my brother. I feel like taking a photo of her and sending it to the ward with a note..see I'm still here..

I know Managers are supposed to purely do that..manage..but for heavens sake let them not lose sight of the people who's lives are affected by the decisions they make. I agree with all your post Kaptau and all I can say is ditto especially to the last paragraph!
p.s. sorry to go on..:-)
Wednesday 19 November 2008 12.22am
As I read the Metro every morning on the way to work, I am extremely saddened by the death of this angelic child. I couldn't help being pessimistic about how many more in the pipeline. I wonder if the mother of the child and her accomplices have been living like animals to inflict such terrible injury. Have these people been left to rot away in their insolated world without being known far too long, looked down by the society and considered not worthy by cost-cutting Managers? The root of this tragedy should be seriously considered too other than the care of the local council. What made these people thought that it was alright to inflict injury to a child just to see how he responded?

As for St Thomas Hospital, my sister was admitted to the hospital 2 Christmas ago. She has a history of unresolved bleeding. It took the Ambulance about an hour to get to Oxford Circus tube station from St Thomas. The paramedics were kind but the one attending to my sister had problem spelling and understanding simple medical condition e.g. fibroid, uterine, etc. For a paramedic not to know this is beyond belief. He struggled to fill in this complicated form as the ambulance was bouncing and swaying with every turning it made me felt sick not just my sister by the time we got to the hospital. Eventually, I completed most part of the form for him so that he could concentrate on my sister in the ambulance. My sister was their first patient for the shift. It was a quiet evening according to the paramedics and I was really glad that my sister was given a bed upon arrival. Unfortunately, the nightmare began here. The nurse in charge ignored me when I was talking to her about my sister's condition on arrival. The untrained paramedics did not tell her that my sister have a history of heart problem and severe bleeding, etc simply because he had no idea what they were when I explained other than high blood pressure. The nurse refused to give me any eye contact and turned her back on us. She sat in front of the computer for as long as I could remember talking to two other nurses. In addition, there was one other health assistant and 3 doctors sitting in front of us in the nurses station. There were 6 beds on the ward and half empty. I rarely seen any of these people leaving the ward and I presumed they must not have other patients elsewhere. Her bed was dirty and the paramedics left her on their bed. The sink by her bedside was full of intravenous fluid bags with the needles attached to them. There was no alcohol gel, gloves and aprons on site. The bin by the sink was full. It didn't take me long to find everything in the clinical room nearby. Afterall, I work in the hospital. My sister was not seen for over 2 hours by which time her blood pressure was 200 plus. Just before this, I managed to push this huge equipment (size of a washing machine) over from the other side of the nurses station to measure her oxygen saturation, heart rate and blood pressure. I walked around the ward looking for disposable oxygen mask ...before plugging in and hey presto! Her lips started looking more radiant than grey. Everyone saw me pushed this machine over but no one asked or stopped me. I eventually raise the alarm of her high BP to a nurse but was ignored. When I told the doctor he seemed to take it seriously but disappear and never came back. A young lady doctor showed up just after as I raised my voice! My sister could have 'popped' (stroke). The young doctor apologised that we were missed as no one knew my sister was admitted. How could this be possible when I have asked for my sister to be seen twice and her bed was opposite the 'busy' nurses station about 2 metres away? I even gave her an allergy tag on her wrist and got the urine sample ready before anyone told us what to do, and completed the observation charts (instead of the nurse) by her bedside. I have simply done the job of these nurses chatting at the end of the bed.

Recently, they sent me an appointment letter with someone else's name on it. What a breach of patient confidentiality.
Wednesday 19 November 2008 1.07pm
My Giddy Aunt Kaptau, Thank God you were there. The lack of basic medical knowledge and spelling is not limited to paramedics.
How is she now? and a blood pressure of 200!

The scenario of staff chatting whilst at the workstations is so common. Waiting politely for a break in conversation between doctor and nurse talking about non patient things went by the board after a few weeks of Don being an inpatient..

Especially when he was placed in a room right at the end of the corridor and because no one had bothered to ensure that an 80 year diabetic was fed or given a drink or had his bloods done, and again in a very hot room..when I arrived he was ranting and raving, I checked his file and found no b.m. was noted..as nurse walked by I grabbed her and asked her why this was not done, she said he was 'agressive' well as agressive as someone suffering from duke c plus acute myloid leukamia and a multitude of other complaints could be..

There was not even a glass or beaker full of water by his bed. Shen then went to get him a build up drink which he downed in seconds, she then took his blood..it was 1..thank heavens I arrived in time.

Then again there was the time some f***idiot gave him a drink of tea on a saucer and dropped it on him, the inco pad held the tea against his buttock! They were talking about the plastic surgery team looking at him ,even the scald was described as 'superficial'..Then there was the agency nurse who told him to blow into the auricular thermometer as it was the same thing! I could go on forever and probably have written about it before on here! He was in and out in the last few months and on every occasion there seemed to be an 'incident'..
What happened to pride in your job? On the emergency admissions ward the staff in charge knew exactly what to do...
Wednesday 19 November 2008 9.59pm
Oh yes. I'm sure for every admission, there is a story to tell. If I ever get to write my experience down, both good and bad, it can well be a series longer than Coronation Street. There are many unsung heroes. Unfortunately only nurses got the media attention as they are the majority. Good nurses are essential but bad nurses are in abundance. Multidisciplinary approach in care is what every patient needs. Even the porter who whisked the long stay inpatients round hospitals for scans could be their only comfort and social connection. Perhaps, their only hope that life is worth living for.

The current management structure does not create the right member of staff to work for them. Hence, patients are losing out. I have lost many 'irreplaceable' colleagues including nurses to places like Singapore, Australia and New Zealand. These countries can't wait to pinch them while ours do not hesitate to get rid of them if they voice their concern too much.

My sister is fine now. She had the surgery and lucky to recover tremendously well. She is back in full time employment. But not all patients have the support of love ones to fight for them. My heart goes to you for what you have been through.

There are many charities for children, cancer, etc with huge media attention and well supported by celebrities. But wait a minute, what about our elderly citizens. Then we have the RSPCA prefixed with an R, what about NSPCC? Don't get me wrong as I'm an absolute animal lover. But are these children, elderly or even our war heroes considered too 'lowly' and best forgotten? Campaigns for respect and care for community are worth investing whether on tv, schools or posters on bus stops instead of junk food and more junk food. In the country where I grew up, big companies like banks and car manufacturers would sponsor such ad on tv especially on festive seasons and bank holidays to remind others that these people are not forgotten. With the full impact of credit crunch looming, perhaps this is time for everyone to reflect what really matters in life and to start caring for their community again. We all need to get through this difficult time together. Perhaps tragedy like Baby P can be avoided.
Thursday 20 November 2008 7.00pm
What I really can't understand is why his grandmother,(who is quoted as saying that just one week before he died he looked as if he'd been in a concentration camp) didn't just grab him and take him away from these monsters? I'd notice if one of my grandchildren had a bruise from the normal bumps of childhood.I love every hair on their heads,as do the vast majority of grandparents, and if anyone dared to lay a finger on them then this worm would turn and there sure would be hell to pay.
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