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Crime and Theft - Gang related activity

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Wednesday 20 May 2009 11.19am
How hard would it be for Plod to set some bike bait?
Wednesday 20 May 2009 12.14pm
I understand that entrapment situations are used in relation to car theft. Unfortunately with bike theft and other what [I imagine] is regarded as 'minor' crime, it's a case of priorites being applied to deployement of resources, and no doubt the weighing of the chances of bringing prosecutions to tick a few more boxes towards performance targets.
Wednesday 20 May 2009 1.46pm
The bait issue is often discussed (to death) on motorbike forums.

General opinion (often including the comments of serving pcs - who may or may not have an insight into what motivates where resources are directed) is that even with gangs stealing motorbikes (the distinction I'm trying to make is that m'bikes generally cost more than pedal cycles, and that m'bike thieves probalby have more assets to confiscate - you need a van to cart away a m'bike, and so you might expect them to be prioritised ahead of pedal cycle thefts), it's not worth the police's time.

...if you press it, they will come.
Wednesday 20 May 2009 1.53pm
Ivanhoe wrote:
The bait issue is often discussed (to death) on motorbike forums.
General opinion..... it's not worth the police's time.
Then the law is an ass. Petty theft is not in fact petty. It infects the daily life of millions and the whole tenor of society.
Wednesday 20 May 2009 1.59pm
I've just been out on a guided tour of a township near NYC. About 40 children were escorted by police cars through their town to learn its history, meet the mayor, meet the chief of police, interact with the local cops. I assure you that a gang of habitual bike thieves in this town wouldn't be tolerated for 5 minutes and the kids would consider them outcasts. It's not the state of mind of the criminals that determines outcomes, it's the passive, defeatist state of mind of Londoners and their police.
Thursday 21 May 2009 8.48am
markadams99 wrote:
I've just been out on a guided tour of a township near NYC. About 40 children were escorted by police cars through their town to learn its history, meet the mayor, meet the chief of police, interact with the local cops. I assure you that a gang of habitual bike thieves in this town wouldn't be tolerated for 5 minutes and the kids would consider them outcasts. It's not the state of mind of the criminals that determines outcomes, it's the passive, defeatist state of mind of Londoners and their police.

I actually think you have a point... Londoners are far too passive when it comes to crime prevention, you're lucky if they'll so much as make a free phone call.

It's not quite the same but I was amazed to watch people step over a lady who was having an epileptic fit on the downstairs floor of a 381 bus. They literally stepped over her quivering body, whilst blanking the bus driver, who was asking if someone could please call an ambulance. The only person that would aid the poor girl was myself and an elderly lady.

If people are of the mind to ignore someone who needs medical aid then you might be forgiven for thinking that there's little chance of them getting involved in any kind of civic initiative -- such as a guided tour for school children.

Sadly however, London is not a township in New York State, it's very large Metropolitan area with a highly mobile population. Although, all in all, I think NYC (Manhattan included) is actually a kinder, friendlier place than London. OK, so some of the concern is a little saccharin, but people talk to people, something that doesn't happen here. They aren't actually scared of speaking up or engaging a stranger in a conversation.

If you consider for a moment that every city has a type of 'Emotional Economy' then you might logically come to the conclusion that even small kindnesses make an impact.

So what I'd say to MarkAdams99 (and others who have expressed negative viewpoints about their environment) is if you don't like the situation then do something about it.

Find the time contribute something, give up some of your time to help a local youth group, make that call to the police when you see something, check on your elderly neighbour, arrange to meet the local police at a neighbourhood meeting and tell them your priorities. Be nice to someone! Or for that matter volunteer as a Special Constable and get directly involved in policing your community.

But whatever you do, try and make more credits to London's 'emotional economy' than debits, eventually it will pay off. Moaning about it (as is often the tendency in this country) whilst not contributing anything is a 'debit' act... maybe we should all try and not be quite so overdrawn! Or for that matter carry around what Markadams99 describes as a defeatist state of mind.
Thursday 21 May 2009 11.17am
jonnyp42 wrote:

So what I'd say to MarkAdams99 (and others who have expressed negative viewpoints about their environment) is if you don't like the situation then do something about it.
And I'd reply: read this thread. But, in order to boost the emotional economy of this forum, I'd add, thankyou for your interesting comments.
This is the Chief of Police showing the kids how to shoot a bike thief:
Sunday 7 June 2009 1.52am
jonnyp42 wrote:
markadams99 wrote:
jonnyp42 wrote:
Moan, moan, moan... Markadams99 -- I suggest you email the Safer Neighbourhoods team via the Met website.
http://www.met.police.uk/teams/southwark/riverside/

I've had contact with the Sergeant and found him to be very helpful.
Why? I've reported to the police, I've reported to the Riverside something or other, now you want me to report to someone else. Anyone else after that? This religion of process is a bug not a feature. How many teams are there? I don't want teams I want a police force that does policing. i realise you are being helpful, so thankyou, but you might take on board that the problem is deeper than getting attention paid to a particular incident. The police force is institutionally processist, institutionally PC and institutionally unfit for purpose despite employing plenty of fine people.

Given your negative and unproductive attitude, I'm not surprised you're disappointed.

Your cynicism is a self fulfilling prophecy.
I resurrect this cut and thrust (I do enjoy it) only to add an expert opinion:
Chief Constable of Greater Manchester wrote:
The performance regime of the last few years has produced a style of performance management which is focused on the figures themselves as the outcome and sees compliance with processes as the best way to produce that outcome.
The interesting article bears out the 'cynics' view of modern policing.
Sunday 7 June 2009 3.38pm
I think you'll find that the views of the CC of GMP are shared by most police officers as well.

This might interest you...

http://inspectorgadget.wordpress.com/2009/06/03/hazel-blears-the-awful-truth/ this link will take you to a piece on he's penned on the lovely Hazel Blears.

There is no denying that Nu-Labour had sought to do to the Police what they did to the NHS, targets always have unforeseen 'Outcomes'.

Peter Fahy would never dare come out and say those things in public... Roger Baker the CC of Essex does however say exactly what he thinks!

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/lawandorder/5324367/Scrapping-barmy-projects-would-put-20000-more-bobbies-on-the-beat-police-chief-says.html

I'd suggest that as Brown's power ebbs there are those within the senior ranks of the Police Service that will also find a backbone!
Monday 8 June 2009 2.58pm
Just a heads up for the Grange Road area - One of the ground floor flats in my building was broken into (but thankfully stopped) at 5:30pm on Friday afternoon. The owner had stuck some earplugs in because of the builder in the next door flat and was having an afternoon snooze.

She was woken up by some closer banging noises and went through into her lounge to investigate only to find someone trying to climb through her lounge window. The window had been closed/ locked and they had used a screwdriver to somehow open the latch.

Thankfully they legged it, jumped back over her wall and ran off, but she (and I - because I live directly above her and often leave my windows open - although they are usually on a security latch) are pretty disturbed by this as her garden has a 6' wall and it is also entirely enclosed within the internal/ secure gardens of the flats between Dunton Road and Alscot Road/ Way and the retirement home on the corner.

So be careful - there are thieves about again and they are targetting our area!
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