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Last day of bendies on the 521

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Friday 4 September 2009 6.29am
Jerry wrote:
Please don't say that the bendy buses cause less traffic jams than their smaller counterparts.

How will the 31 buses on the 521 route that will be required to replace the capacity of the 19 bendy buses cause less congestion? What about the increased exhaust fumes caused by the 12 extra vehicles? What about the cost of employing 12 extra bus drivers to drive the same amount of passengers?

How can the cost and time spent on replacing the bendy buses be worth it considering the other pressing problems London faces - it's gesture politics at its worst.
Friday 4 September 2009 8.02am
Joanthon K sorry to not value what you have highlighted but its done now...the real maistake was introducing them in the first place....and while there are lots of other problems for TfL to worry about too sorting out previous mistakes is also necessary. They should never have been introduced, don't fit on London's roads, cause problems for all road users including pedestrians, and have incited a social change where people don't queue and don't pay for riding buses (not everyone but a a large number). They have been a disaster financially, unreliable (remember the ones bursting into flames) and have added to accidents of all sorts on our roads. Time to get over the squabbling and look forward to what we need to replace them and how they should operate.
Friday 4 September 2009 8.55am
williamn wrote:
I suspect most people who ranted against Bendy-buses never actually used them. From a passengers perspective they are pretty nice buses.

This may well be true. I seldom take buses, but they do tend to have a regular negative impact on my daily travels (either on scooter, on cycle, on foot, or in the back of the odd taxi). I'm very happy for buses carrying several people to take precedence on the roads. My problem is that I think they cause more trouble than they need to.

Buses tend to be either blocking an intersection; taking up two lanes at an intersection, or when turning a corner; swinging so wide on a corner that I need to watch where I stand whilst I'm on the pavement waiting to cross; jumping red lights; etc.

A lot of the time, the buses who cause these problems are bendies. As everyone has said, they're longer and harder to thread through city streets.

One solution is to replace the bendies.

I wonder whether another solution would be to insist that the drivers stick to the rules of the road, and drive properly?

If it's impossible to drive a bendy around London without staying mainly in one lane (which I refuse to believe), then they should never have commissioned them.

If what it takes is to (a) give the bendy drivers some proper training, so they can do their job without feeling the need to take up the whole of a two-lane road, and (b) to then enforce decent driving standards, then why aren't we trying that instead of buying new fleets of buses to replace the bendies?

...if you press it, they will come.
Friday 4 September 2009 9.08am
I wonder whether another solution would be to insist that the drivers stick to the rules of the road, and drive properly?

I may have said it before on here but I can repeat myself. It was quite shocking to my sister from Cheshire to learn that in Southwark and other parts of London a red light does not mean a vehicle will stop. We had to teach my niece and nephew that the green man does not mean it's safe to cross. Why are there no traffic laws here?
Friday 4 September 2009 9.57am
I used to travel the 453 all the time and while travelling i only had my ticket checked once by an inspector but during the day i used to see the Police and TFL doing sweeps of the 453 when it pulled up at the Whitehall stop outside the Treasury. They always seemed to pull off a sizeable number of people.

That said i agree with other posters the 'fear factor' is not there to stop people travelling without a valid ticket. I lived in Berlin and used to get my ticket checked on tube, bus and tram every couple of days and they were really serious about it.
Friday 4 September 2009 12.58pm
beetroot wrote:
It was quite shocking to my sister from Cheshire to learn that in Southwark and other parts of London a red light does not mean a vehicle will stop.

However, you can use this knowledge to your advantage. When I'm waiting at a crossroads, I can use it to gauge when "my" lights will turn green.

It usually happens about 1 second after the bus coming the other way races across, revving for all it's worth, and belching out some nice black smoke.

...if you press it, they will come.
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