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Anti-Cuts March 26th March

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Tuesday 29 March 2011 10.08am
I agree Jackie, but I think the march was about the range, depth and speed of the cuts - not about whether cuts are required. And it seems that, once again, the most vulnerable and needy will be the targets.
Tuesday 29 March 2011 12.36pm
jackie rokotnitz wrote:
...Somehow or another we just have to get on top of our deficit, and whose fault it is that it's there is not relevant...the blame game is all very well, but one has to face the facts.

I think whose fault it is remains a very poignant question and if we don't try to find an answer to it then the whole cycle just revolves again.

People tell me about sovereign debt and the big deficit and I just say to them - 'was it you, did you spend that money because it sure as hell wasn't me!'.

I doubt it was many others on this list either. But someone was raking it in they are still raking it and yet we are told we are all in it together. I would hope that many people on the demo are not asking so much about 'how much to cut' and 'how soon to cut it' but why do we have to make cuts
Tuesday 29 March 2011 3.04pm
I take your word for it then Jerry - they weren't there when I arrived at the embankment at 11.00, but I did move down a way and spent three hours mainly watching as I couldn't march, and didn't see any masked people during that time.

Jackie - who are all these people who feel they need to have everything all the time, now - I have worked for thirty years as an Occupational Therapist in the community and the NHS and have come across very few people who could be described like this.
Or do you mean some of the bankers, who are hardly belt-tightening!
Which of the demonstrators do you think fit this picture? All of them, or just some of them? The union members, the representatives of charities who give their free time to help others, the pensioners, the parents of disadvantaged children. Generalisations are a dangerous thing, that need to be reflected on and questioned. The months and months of propoganda by government and media have certainly been effective with you! A lot of ordinary people are going to suffer through loss of essential services and jobs, and lack of funding for charities, and not everybody can afford to buy their own home care or equipment, books, etc or maybe have to live on £65 a week. Can you? If so you are fortunate - enjoy.

It is accepted by most people that we are in a mess and need to look at how this can be managed. However that doesn't mean that we shouldn't have a view about how this happens. It is called democracy.
Tuesday 29 March 2011 6.42pm
Heaven forfend that I should suggest that people should not have all the right in the world to self expression. I'm all for democracy. Alas, it is NOT just the greedy bankers and hedgefund managers who expect instant gratification. There are a great many people sitting on sink estates in the North East who feel that everything is owed to them and woe betide if they dont get it. This is a disease which is found all over, regardless of socio-economic circumstances. Cuts will hurt. They'll hurt you and me and pretty well anyone we know. But when there was a war on (when I was young) everyone cheerfully accepted that one had to pare back. And this is tantamount to war - our country is at risk.
Tuesday 29 March 2011 7.49pm
Straying somewhat from anything SE1 related any more, but I thought this was a good article putting the perspective that, in fact, cuts aren't the right thing to be doing at all.

http://johannhari.com/2011/03/29/the-biggest-lie-in-british-politics
Tuesday 29 March 2011 10.54pm
It is utterly ridiculous to equate the current circumstances to the last World War, for more reasons than I care to elaborate here. We are not all in this together either, as the current situation is having little impact on those who had a rather essential part in enabling this to happen in the first place (seen any hedge fund managers on the streets lately, short selling for their next meal? I think not) but an immense impact on those who already are struggling (and this is only going to get worse, as the cuts have yet to bite).

There is a financial crisis, of that we all agree but the mechanism for dealing with this needs to be long term or ultimately all the cuts in the world will amount to nothing but greater problems (as unemployment rises, spending decreases, essential services are lost and then prove immensely costly to recover, and the spiral downwards only gets worse). How about some radical and long-term thinking here (God forbid) rather than depending on a simple and rather crass capitalist model, relying on nothing more than lower public spending and a naive belief that the private sector is going to come to the rescue. All of us affected by this situation have every right to be angry and protest. I fear this will have little impact but with sufficient will who knows? I'd rather try and lose than offer no resistance at all.
Wednesday 30 March 2011 6.03am
bdim wrote:
How about some radical and long-term thinking here (God forbid) rather than depending on a simple and rather crass capitalist model, relying on nothing more than lower public spending and a naive belief that the private sector is going to come to the rescue.

Who else is going to come to the rescue but the private sector? Growth there equals more companies offering more real jobs, so more tax to pay for services. The socialist model of full employment has not prospered in any nation and brings with it the ultimate nanny state, with all that implies. What we have isn't perfect, not even close, but I've yet to see another country with an economic model that is fault free.
Wednesday 30 March 2011 7.27am
jackie rokotnitz wrote:
Heaven forfend that I should suggest that people should not have all the right in the world to self expression. I'm all for democracy. Alas, it is NOT just the greedy bankers and hedgefund managers who expect instant gratification. There are a great many people sitting on sink estates in the North East who feel that everything is owed to them and woe betide if they dont get it. This is a disease which is found all over, regardless of socio-economic circumstances. Cuts will hurt. They'll hurt you and me and pretty well anyone we know. But when there was a war on (when I was young) everyone cheerfully accepted that one had to pare back. And this is tantamount to war - our country is at risk.


Or the sink estates in Southwark.

http://www.camhs.slam.nhs.uk/Services/Southwark/tabid/342/Default.aspx

Unemployment at 18% is amongst the highest in London, with certain parts of the borough having up to 30% unemployment.


http://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news/teesside-breaking-news/2010/11/18/middlesbrough-tops-unemployment-league-84229-27673068/

Middlesbrough now has the highest rate of unemployment in the country.

Latest unemployment figures have revealed 6,555 people claimed Jobseeker’s Allowance in the borough last month - a rise of just 12. But the area’s unemployment rate of 7.1% now places it above former league leader Kingston upon Hull


Of course the poor people of Soutwark have to struggle with poor transport infrastructure to get those distant prosperous areas with all the jobs in Victoria, West End, Canary Wharf. While residents of Midddlesbrough can walk to nearby Newcastle or Leeds but the can'T be bothered
Wednesday 30 March 2011 9.21am
jackie rokotnitz wrote:
There are a great many people sitting on sink estates in the North East who feel that everything is owed to them and woe betide if they dont get it.

With respect, Jackie, do you know this as a fact? What has the North East ever done to you?

For the record, I tend to agree with the spirit of some of what you're saying (i.e. that there's a strong trend of entitlement throughout people today, and that it's not useful or healthy), but it seems a bit harsh to single out the NE (unless I'm missing something)

...if you press it, they will come.
Wednesday 30 March 2011 12.49pm
Dear Jackie,

I'd urge you to re-consider this statement concerning the north-east, of which I have direct experience. It comes across at best as ill-informed, at worst, the kind of soft bigotry that I really dislike about political discourse in Britain.

It's possible for honest men/women to disagree, e.g I completely disagree with theedy's assertion that it wasn't the derivatives/securities market that was responsible for much of the irresponsible lending that went on before 2008. However, if we are to solve the problems of post-industrial decline, which are intensely complex, I don't think broad-brush insults based on personal prejudice are very constructive. If you read my previous comment, and indeed do some basic research, you'll realise our current fiscal policy decisions are one choice among several, not the only possible way of dealing with our current woes. If the March had a message, I believe that was it.

Very off-topic SE1 now, so I'll close with a 'well done' to all those who marched.
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