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Homeless sleeping all over parks

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Tuesday 4 October 2011 6.06pm
Working from home and overseeing the park during the day makes me thick these days. Once punch drunk by 11am they are getting very abusive and I feel sorry for the moms & kids passing by. During night they always find shelter in the closed pub “The Valentines” and that’s something the council should take care of. Send a letter a while ago but haven’t received an answer yet.
Tuesday 4 October 2011 6.21pm
The Valentine pub is a black hole under everybody's eyes.

The only derelict place in a refurbished area..

Any idea anybody?
Tuesday 4 October 2011 7.49pm
I find it such a shame that these people who generally suffer from mental illnesses (some are ex-army personnel who have suffered psychological injuries during combat) are being treated with such disdain. The not-in-my-backyard attitude ignores their plight and the problem of homeless people at large.

If you really want to help resolve the problem try volunteering your time to help them get back a sense of self-worth. Crisis, Centrepoint and Combat Stress are just three groups which aim to help homeless people by helping them look for work amongst other things.
Tuesday 4 October 2011 7.54pm
Having done come Crisis work, the services they offer work best with homeless folks who are ready to move on from that situation.

However, I met a few homeless folks who were very willing to take what Crisis offers - but had absolutely no intention of leaving the streets. There is a fine line between offering services to folks and telling them how they should live their lives.
Tuesday 4 October 2011 8.04pm
Boss St Bloke wrote:
Having done come Crisis work, the services they offer work best with homeless folks who are ready to move on from that situation.
However, I met a few homeless folks who were very willing to take what Crisis offers - but had absolutely no intention of leaving the streets. There is a fine line between offering services to folks and telling them how they should live their lives.

Out of genuine interest - do you know what it is that makes people who have no intention of leaving the streets tick? What makes them want to lead their life like this?
Tuesday 4 October 2011 8.11pm
Camaraderie, if you live on the streets your friends are the ones who watch your back when your sleeping, share their meths/cider/joints when you aint got one...
Many street sleepers have no family through either their own behavious or have had to leave when new Dads abuse them.

If these people who poo everywhere, dirty sods, why dont the council provide portaloos at the back of the parks? I know they should not have to, buts whats the alternative?
Tuesday 4 October 2011 8.25pm
Simonsays, do you think the only solution is volunteering?
Some people might be doing already very demanding jobs or having big family pressure or God knows what..

People like you always want to make the others appear like evil individuals who do not have empathy.

In SE1 the amount of rough sleepers is very high. It is a fact.

What some people is saying here is that some times what you need is a more coordinated effort from the authorities who are trained to work with such problematic.

To help them finding a better option than just binge drinking their livers off in the parks.

Months ago residents of a local estate had to wash their garages almost every day because homeless were sleeping and peeing in their properties. Not easy believe it or not.
Tuesday 4 October 2011 9.14pm
Jan the old one wrote:
If these people who poo everywhere, dirty sods, why dont the council provide portaloos at the back of the parks? I know they should not have to, buts whats the alternative?

Just being practical here, but where do you poo if you don't have a home? No pub/restaurant/coffeeshop will let you come in. The portaloo idea is ok, although I would "confine" the homeless to certain areas of certain parks, and only to limited numbers. I guess that a lot of them living together / spending most of their time together leads to creating a community, they become institutionalised, like long-term prisoners and it becomes harder, if not impossible to break out.
Tuesday 4 October 2011 9.27pm
On Saturday afternoon, we walked past the playground on Long Lane (Bermondsey Sq end) and there was a group of men gathered drinking in the corner. As we went by, two of them got up and urinated in turn. We were away for about an hour, and on the way back they were still there and I saw two men urinating again. They weren’t being abusive, as others have mentioned, but the play area is specifically for children and I would have felt really uncomfortable taking a child in there on that day.
Tuesday 4 October 2011 9.32pm
eDWaRD WooDWaRD wrote:
Out of genuine interest - do you know what it is that makes people who have no intention of leaving the streets tick? What makes them want to lead their life like this?

It's a good question mate and I have no real answer for you - just observation.

Some clients (as they must be called) are extremely proud and fiercely independent. They will gladly except material help (new clothes, food, medical attention, etc) but will not accept help to find jobs or flats. They want to return to the streets. They are not lazy or freeloaders.

Most are articulate intelligent human beings who enjoy their life style and will not be dictated to. Fair play, I got satisfaction out of doing my very small bit and admire their stoic free spirit.
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