London SE1 community website

Demolition of 21 Webber Street

Join in these discussions today! Log in or register.
Pages:  Previous1 2 3 4 Next
Current: 2 of 4
Saturday 21 January 2012 5.44pm
This is truly grim to lose such a superb building. Is it not possible to do anything via Michael Tsoukaris [email protected] Southwark's Head of Design and Conservation in terms of getting it locally listed at the very least. Southwark is working on the local list at present I think.
Friday 3 February 2012 5.41pm
How old is the building? The demolition application talks about a 20th century building, at the end of its economic life, and delapidated.

It's not unattractive, but walking past and seeing the reference to the petition this morning prompted more interest. What is the background and history? There was something about a bakery on the discrete poster.
Friday 3 February 2012 11.27pm
What a lovely building -- I hope it does not get knocked down.
Monday 26 March 2012 5.43pm
DominicZorro wrote:
How old is the building? The demolition application talks about a 20th century building, at the end of its economic life, and delapidated.
It's not unattractive, but walking past and seeing the reference to the petition this morning prompted more interest. What is the background and history? There was something about a bakery on the discrete poster.

sorry it's taken so long to respond! it was a bakery. it's only a bit dilapidated because the owner hasn't looked after it but it's nothing structural. it's currently occupied with several businesses. it needs refurbishing or renovating - not demolition

the info we have -
"The guess is it is about 1905-10 with various later extensions.
The directories suggest it was built for Maltina Bakeries, and there was
an extension around 1910 which is mentioned in a rag called Concrete and
Constructional Engineering. The
same search revealed that a lady called Violet Gladys Tyler worked there
and kept a diary now in Lewisham Local Archives (A98/9),covering the
years 1937-41. Maltina Bakeries seems to have been reconstructed as a
company in 1920 and finally wound up in 1947."
Wednesday 28 March 2012 11.27am
A new conservation area was created last night:

http://www.london-se1.co.uk/news/view/5908

Editor of the London SE1 website.
Subscribe to our SE1 Direct weekly newsletter.
Wednesday 28 March 2012 11.58am
That's really good news.
Wednesday 28 March 2012 12.46pm
Fantastic!
Now if only The Bell pub on Webber Street could also be encompassed in the C.A.!
Monday 2 April 2012 11.01am
The photos look great in the main. Maybe if the places where fully functional and not showing signs of being vacant they could look better.

I do have to say that there is another side to this. By conserving the area it effectively does two things. It removes some of the economic value of the property from the present owners. In effect they have suffered a loss and the loss has been imposed from the government. Should there be compensation?

Second and maybe a longer term issue is the property will be under utilized going forward. By that I mean the ability to build up is lost. While this might be visually pleasing and of historical significance it places a burden on the other land in the area that is not part of a conservation order. This means that fewer business or fewer homes can be built. It also means that the property that can be built on will now have an increased value and more likely that higher end developments will be placed there. If people want more housing or lower cost work space to be available, removing some of the land tends to force this in the opposite way.

My point in posting this is to say that conversation comes at a price. It has benefits to some and costs to others. Who bears the costs and who benefits is not always well aligned. In some ways, the more historically protected an area the more likely wealthy will move in and the poor will be priced out. Preservation can be a benefit to many who pass through but the biggest benefits are to those who can afford to live and work in historic areas. This is not always the present land owners when the conversation request is proposed. If there had been a conservation order back when it was time to build these buildings it might have meant they would never have happened. What preceded these building might have been just as historic or more so. Freezing an area's look and feel could result in museum pieces for the wealthy rathe than useable areas for working people.

Monday 2 April 2012 1.13pm
John – could not agree more, the point need to be balancing between different types of public and privet goods.
Just saying that nothing can change is unhelpful but instead conversions which allow for extensions (up/sideways) are, in my opinion, the best option this way the areas is developed and used, you get more residents/business in, the economic right of the owners are protected and you keep the facade’s historical look (which some modern twist to it that can be of great artistic merit on its own). ,
Just my 2 cents…
Monday 2 April 2012 3.27pm
Just look at what's happening along the river in Bermondsey and around Elephant and all those 6+storey buildings going up in the corridor replacing single story warehouses running south of Tate modern down to Elephant - there's your density! There's even skyscraper's due further up Blackfriars road (or there were - always hard keeping up!) and then other underutilised and unloved buildings further down Blackfriars road waiting for something to happen to them.
Pages:  Previous1 2 3 4 Next
Current: 2 of 4

To post a message, please log in or register..
Keep up with SE1 news

We have three email newsletters for you to choose from:

We are part of
Independent Community News Network
Email newsletter

For the latest local news and events direct to your inbox every Monday, you need our weekly email newsletter SE1 Direct.

7,000+ locals read it every week. Can you afford to miss out?

Read the latest issue before signing up

Also on the forum
Views expressed in this discussion forum are those of the contributors and may not reflect the editorial policy of this website. Please read our terms and conditions