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Sick of all the push bikers jumping lights on Borough High St

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Current: 7 of 45
Sunday 20 May 2012 2.48pm
I'm not trying to be argumentative here, but saying that bikes can kill/injure people and thus should be treated like cars is like saying that a swiss army knife can kill/injure people and thus it should be treated like a nuclear bomb.
Sunday 20 May 2012 4.14pm
james127 wrote:
I'm not trying to be argumentative here, but saying that bikes can kill/injure people and thus should be treated like cars is like saying that a swiss army knife can kill/injure people and thus it should be treated like a nuclear bomb.

I'm not trying to be argumentative either, but what a Swiss army knife and a nuclear bomb have in common is that they both can kill people. The knife not on as large as scale as a bomb, but that won't make much difference to the victim. Underestimating the damage that a bicycle can do is a problem if you ask me. Ironically, if caught by the police carrying a Swiss army knife, you'd probably end up in trouble (I used to carry one for nostalgic reasons), while the laws on dangerous cycling are still too lenient if you ask me.
Sunday 20 May 2012 4.51pm
... the laws on dangerous cycling are still too lenient if you ask me. wrote:

Just thinking back through the fatal road traffic accidents in SE1 in the past few years, roughly once a month someone seems to die on being hit by a car, but I can't remember anyone being killed on being hit by a bicycle.

It would seem more evident that the laws on dangerous driving are far too lenient, too.
Sunday 20 May 2012 4.56pm
Plus, let me add that it has been proven that increasing the number of cyclists on a road slows traffic, which is a positive externality for increasing street safety (cars are, on balance, more dangerous than bikes, I think we can all agree). Unfortunately, increasing cars on the same street has little safety benefit for pedestrians or cyclists until you get to the point of total gridlock when the road just becomes a car park anyway.

Further, dare I suggest that those upset about cyclists on the roads consider segregating them to bike paths and cycle paths. Most cyclists would gladly constrain their 'evil behaviour' to a segregated lane, but the same individuals who whine and complain about cyclists being 'crazy' are those who are also unwilling to give up street space to create segregated lanes (i.e. Dutch).

Force a cyclist to defend his life surrounded by 2 ton monsters, and from time to time, the cyclist will have to act a little crazy -- give him or her a space to behave with dignity, and you'll get dignified behaviour.
Sunday 20 May 2012 4.59pm
Coming out of my house, there are railings outside the house next door, and every evening about 6.30 there are two *******s belting along on the pavement and you cant hear them coming unless you get hit by one. Riding bikes on pavements over the age of 15 should be a hanging offence! tic...
signed jan the ex-pacifist!
Sunday 20 May 2012 5.18pm
One reason my child and I haven't been hit by a cyclist is that I have adjusted my behaviour, i.e. by double checking that, even although my pedestrian crossing is green, I am not stepping into some irresponsible cyclist's path. It certainly isn't down to the responsible behaviour of cyclists. As I have said before, I have cycled in many European countries, I can compare, and cyclists in London don't know how to "cycle properly", nor do many 4 wheeled road users know hwo to deal with cyclists, simply because nothing has been implemented to teach road users how to live alongside each other. Shirking responsibility is not constructive. Many accidents are caused by negligence, either by pedestrians, cyclists or motorists, but many others could be prevented by proper education for all, supported by stricter laws and fines. I am speaking from experience, not from a wish to blame any particular kind of road user. We all carry the same responsibility.
Sunday 20 May 2012 6.57pm
I've been both a cyclist and a motorist in my years on this planet, and I can honestly say that some of today's cyclist should have a 'rules of the road' book thrown at them with a brick attached.
My full catalogue of examples of reckless cyclists is too long for this thread, but they include:
1/ Being almost run down on several occasions by cyclists ignoring the red light at pedestrian crossings.
2/ My neighbour, who spent 18 months on crutches thanks to a 'hit and run' cyclist.
3/ An incident on the seafront in Southend, where a pensioner was hit by a cyclist on a pedestrian crossing and spent weeks in hospital.
4/ Watching in disbelief while driving through the West End as cyclists ignored the red light and weaved in and out of the pedestrians as they crossed the road.
5/ Coming face-to-face with two cyclist who were going the wrong way down a one-way street as I turned right. I swerved to avoid them and got the 'middle finger' for my trouble.
6/ This very morning, watching two cyclists in their finest Lycra, undertake a car which was signalling to turn left. He had to slam his brakes on to avoid them and got a torrent of abuse for his quick reactions.

Some, (emphasise 'some,') of today's cyclists seem to think the rules of the road, or even common courtesy, does not apply to them. Sadly, the number seems to be on the increase.
You know who you are, and you're responsible for your own publicity. If you care.
Sunday 20 May 2012 9.10pm
james127 wrote:
Force a cyclist to defend his life surrounded by 2 ton monsters, and from time to time, the cyclist will have to act a little crazy -- give him or her a space to behave with dignity, and you'll get dignified behaviour.

Important point imho.

Most often I'm a motorcyclist, and I know that I'm VERY vulnerable amongst the "two tonne monsters", but the last thing I'd do is to "act a little crazy". My way of staying safe, and of not endangering anyone else, is to try to be conspicuously calm and predictable.

I'm pro-cyclist, but most days I see cyclists do things on the road which require other people to take action to avoid getting into a crash with them . Either that, or they choose to put thselves down gaps between lorries/buses that give them no guarantee of safety.

I would prefer it if everyone acted with more sense of self preservation

...if you press it, they will come.
Sunday 20 May 2012 10.58pm
Yes, good points. Agreed.
Monday 21 May 2012 12.33am
eDWaRD WooDWaRD wrote:
One reason my child and I haven't been hit by a cyclist is that I have adjusted my behaviour, i.e. by double checking that, even although my pedestrian crossing is green, I am not stepping into some irresponsible cyclist's path. It certainly isn't down to the responsible behaviour of cyclists. As I have said before, I have cycled in many European countries, I can compare, and cyclists in London don't know how to "cycle properly", nor do many 4 wheeled road users know hwo to deal with cyclists, simply because nothing has been implemented to teach road users how to live alongside each other. Shirking responsibility is not constructive. Many accidents are caused by negligence, either by pedestrians, cyclists or motorists, but many others could be prevented by proper education for all, supported by stricter laws and fines. I am speaking from experience, not from a wish to blame any particular kind of road user. We all carry the same responsibility.

Agreed. I just resent having to look around me all the time for cyclists coming up behind to hit me on the pavements.
Current: 7 of 45

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