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Road-marking stencil for "Union Press" project

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Thursday 21 June 2012 1.57am
Matilde wrote:
Merlin Rouge wrote:
Don't forget the old sorting office on Union St. Posties busting their asses at all sorts of odd and often horrible hours of the day! Now Sainsbury HQ or was. Not been there for a while.

Thanks Merlin, interesting. I was wondering what in your opinion makes the Post-Office a place to bring to attention rather than other factories in the area? Do you know any action (or similar) that took place there, important for the local history/memory?

Probably because it wasn't a factory and so the memory of it slips away all the more easier. But it was a big employer in the area and thus contains all the good and bad stories that go with it. Heritage history often focuses on industrial labour but forgets the big employers like the Post and the Trains.
Thursday 21 June 2012 11.22am
Matilde,

I'm not sure how far back you want to go in history or if this is even relevant but details of some previous businesses in Union Street here: http://www.london-se1.co.uk/forum/read/1/39262/page=1
Thursday 21 June 2012 11.23pm
As a Blitz historian the most significant event in Union Street was the V1 that thundered into the junction with Great Suffolk Street on 19 June 1944, killing 49 people and injuring scores more. The evidence of this is still apparent on the repairs to the estate on the south west side of Union Street. Further reminders of the Blitz are evident in Pepper Street with black out paint on street bollards (and in Southwark Bridge Road).

One further and rare reminder of the Blitz is the Emergency Water Supply sign on the wall of the former school, now Jerwood Space, in Copperfield Street-I only know of a further half dozen in London.
Friday 22 June 2012 2.38pm
Matilde wrote:
Clive S wrote:
Imagine you've considered Mary Wollstonecroft (Dolben St) and been to Info Shop http://www.56a.org.uk/ they'd supply maps like: http://www.alphabetthreat.co.uk/pasttense/page6.html
But maybe you could also include legendary labour figure Jack Dash.

Thanks Clive for your precious help.
Mary Wollstonecroft needs definetely a road marking.

I've also been to the Info Shop, and I must say that the original map is really, really nice, and the bookshop as well. I will contact the authors.

Regarding Jack Dash, I was wondering if you know any direct place or action (a strike?) organized in the area of Union Street.

Hi Matilde
No, I don't have a specific spot to say Jack Dash was here, but this link http://libcom.org/history/nine-days-may-1926-general-strike-southwark covers the 1926 General Strike in the area and Jack. He was a teenager but witnessed scenes at both ends of Union Street that affected him hugely. It's a longish, but fascinating read nevertheless!
Great project, looking forward to seeing your stencils, be happy to help out, Clive
Friday 22 June 2012 9.52pm
The Romans!

Excavations at 8-10 Union Street PDF here.
Saturday 23 June 2012 11.46am
beetroot wrote:
The Romans!
Excavations at 8-10 Union Street PDF here.

Great! I had heard something about archeological escavations but I was wondering where they was!
Saturday 23 June 2012 11.49am
Merlin Rouge wrote:
Probably because it wasn't a factory and so the memory of it slips away all the more easier. But it was a big employer in the area and thus contains all the good and bad stories that go with it. Heritage history often focuses on industrial labour but forgets the big employers like the Post and the Trains.

Thanks!
Saturday 23 June 2012 11.48pm
dang, I was going to go to the local history library & do a thing for this as I lived on Union Street up until recently & still live in SE1. Also it would have combined my love of local history & art but then the Football happend and tbf I love that even more and I so forgot. Anyway, the local history library for Southwark & Bermondsey etc may be useful for the thing that your doing, idk for sure.
Sunday 24 June 2012 2.03pm
Clive S wrote:
Hi Matilde
No, I don't have a specific spot to say Jack Dash was here, but this link http://libcom.org/history/nine-days-may-1926-general-strike-southwark covers the 1926 General Strike in the area and Jack. He was a teenager but witnessed scenes at both ends of Union Street that affected him hugely. It's a longish, but fascinating read nevertheless!
Great project, looking forward to seeing your stencils, be happy to help out, Clive

Hello Clive, thanks as usual. I think the best is a stencil "Jack Dash", at both the ends of Union Street with arrows in 4 directions, that means his importance is related to a broad area rather than a specific corner.
Sunday 24 June 2012 2.16pm
420 inch boner wrote:
dang, I was going to go to the local history library & do a thing for this as I lived on Union Street up until recently & still live in SE1. Also it would have combined my love of local history & art but then the Football happend and tbf I love that even more and I so forgot. Anyway, the local history library for Southwark & Bermondsey etc may be useful for the thing that your doing, idk for sure.

Thanks! If you have time, do come next Tuesday, 26th June, from 10am to 6pm, at Flat Iron Square in Union Street. You could choose your favourite stencil and also tell me a little bit more about the Union Street and the area from the point of view of a previous resident!

ps: I'm Italian and this evening, footbal match Italy vs England...
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