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Have you lost a wedding ring? An old, old scam

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Sunday 2 December 2012 5.29pm
Could just have handed it in at police station in the first place!
Sunday 2 December 2012 5.47pm
Suzi

Thanks. Thought of that, but as an ex Police Officer they take the details, file it away and after a few months dump the old stuff not claimed to some place.

All the monies to some loony left Council somewhere.

At least the person in question stands some chance of getting it back if they can just be bothered to look.

But your point is a good one in that I will ask them tomorrow if they, per chance, have had a lost report.

Each to their own in life !.
Monday 3 December 2012 4.52pm
Suziq is exactly right, you should have handed it in at the local police station because that is the most likely place the loser would go to try and find it. As an ex police officer I think you will know that you have no right to claim ownership of The Ring and consequently have no right to dispose of it for your own profit.
If you had handed it in you could have checked 3 months later and if it had not been claimed the police could release it to your custody and, to all intents and purposes, it would be yours to do what you wanted, but the original owner would not forfeit their title to the ring.
I do believe that there might be a case of "Stealing by finding"
Monday 3 December 2012 5.10pm
The police do not dispose of lost property to some loony council. If it is of any value it goes to auction and the money it makes goes to the police widows and orphans fund. As an ex-police officer surely you know that?
Monday 3 December 2012 9.04pm
All right guys

Thanks for your input. I'll leave it to the Police to sort out and I'm done. Thanks for all your thoughts.

Best.
Saturday 26 January 2013 12.36pm
I think I may just have been targeted by the gold ring gang on Southwark Street... An Eastern European looking gentleman walking towards me suddenly bends over and picks up something shiny and then shows it too me as I walk past. I had headphones on, am farsighted and was in a hurry, so I didn't bother to stop. In hindsight I wish I'd been quick enough to take the ring, say "thank you" and walk on...
Friday 15 March 2013 9.42am
This scam is alive and well on Westminster Bridge.

I must have "MUG" written all over me - what with biker-locked-out-woman.

I told the eastern European ring lady that she should be ashamed, she said she had no food. Wish I could have seen a copper.
Friday 15 March 2013 12.12pm
BstB = that was where it happened to me! I declined.
Saturday 16 March 2013 8.50am
An 'old, old scam' indeed - but I hadn't realised just how old until I came across the following in Francis Grose's Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, published in 1811:

DROP COVES.
Persons who practice the fraud of dropping a ring or other article, and picking it up before the person intended to be defrauded, they pretend that the thing is very valuable to induce their gull to lend them money, or to purchase the article. See FAWNY RIG, and MONEY DROPPERS.

FAWNEY RIG.
A common fraud, thus practised: A fellow drops a brass ring, double gilt, which he picks up before the party meant to be cheated, and to whom he disposes of it for less than its supposed, and ten times more than its real, value.

The 'fawney rig' was the 'ring trick' (from Irish 'fainne', meaning a ring, and 'rig' as in 'rigged game') - but it seems to be the origin of the modern word 'phoney'.

So next time you see a drop cove pulling the fawney rig on a gull, you'll know it's phoney.
Saturday 16 March 2013 8.57am
John C wrote:
An 'old, old scam' indeed - but I hadn't realised just how old until I came across the following in Francis Grose's Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, published in 1811:
DROP COVES.
Persons who practice the fraud of dropping a ring or other article, and picking it up before the person intended to be defrauded, they pretend that the thing is very valuable to induce their gull to lend them money, or to purchase the article. See FAWNY RIG, and MONEY DROPPERS.

FAWNEY RIG.
A common fraud, thus practised: A fellow drops a brass ring, double gilt, which he picks up before the party meant to be cheated, and to whom he disposes of it for less than its supposed, and ten times more than its real, value.

The 'fawney rig' was the 'ring trick' (from Irish 'fainne', meaning a ring, and 'rig' as in 'rigged game') - but it seems to be the origin of the modern word 'phoney'.

So next time you see a drop cove pulling the fawney rig on a gull, you'll know it's phoney.

Brilliant!
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