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Housing, development, and the changing population - Discuss!

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Tuesday 5 May 2015 1.43pm
Karen - that's part of the solution but far from the whole one. It was tried from the late '40s for about 3 decades with limited success.

London has one of the lowest housing densities of any major city in its centre. Far lower than new York. Far lower than Paris with it's mid-rises, so high density does not just mean towers, though they have a role in select areas like Canary Wharf.

And what London does build now is so expensive the majority is sold abroad as investments and barely used. We don't even tax these sales to overseas buyers at high rates to help fund new builds (except for VERY expensive properties which is a tiny minority), which is what almost every other developed nation does.

Back to spreading business around the UK - well Whitehall and Westminster will have to devolve powers to cities so they can actually decide and have powers on business rates, transport etc. I moved out of London and was shocked how few powers other English cities have - most decisions are taken in Whitehall and imposed around the country, often against local city/council/people's wishes and more often than not failed.
Tuesday 5 May 2015 2.42pm
FTMD wrote:
London has one of the lowest housing densities of any major city in its centre. Far lower than new York. Far lower than Paris with it's mid-rises, so high density does not just mean towers, though they have a role in select areas like Canary Wharf.
Southwark already has the 9th highest population density in England, just below that of Moscow, the city with the 6th highest population density in Europe.
Wednesday 6 May 2015 9.47am
John_Corey wrote:
A great thread. ..... bandage.

I guess you too will have no problem being evicted forcibly from your home if necessary? After all if its for the greater good....
Saturday 30 May 2015 11.32am
Saw this article just now,which is about Tower Hamlets and social cleansing,but it could so easily be about Southwark, past, present, and future. We are all familiar with the Heygate and Aylesbury stories, and I sit here wondering what next for us in Southwark? The topic has gone a bit quiet on the forum,but is never far from my thoughts. The election results seem to have stimulated more greed with little concern for those who are not rich. Depressing.

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/may/30/london-property-market-boom-housing-tower-hamlets
Saturday 30 May 2015 3.33pm
If someone did redevelop an ageing LA estate, improve it, rehouse all the residents back on the estate after the redevelopment, and manage to pay for it by building additional units on the existing site, and if the existing tenants' rights could be protected, and if their views took first place in agreeing the overall new plan, would there be a problem with that?

...if you press it, they will come.
Saturday 30 May 2015 3.51pm
Ivanhoe, could you give me an example please of where this has happened in London?
Thanks
Sunday 31 May 2015 9.59am
Don't have one. Hypothetical Q.

...if you press it, they will come.
Sunday 31 May 2015 10.09am
I doubt it would ever be financially viable Ivanhoe.

I was given some idea how it works by a caller to a radio show on development/housing. Bloke had bought a large run down house, he was going to convert it into 6 units. He had everything sorted, secured the finance and had worked out margins and was ready to go, he then received a letter from the council ordering that one of the units had to be an affordable home, this scuppered the whole deal and it never went ahead.
Sunday 31 May 2015 10.32am
Interesting,Boroughonian. This affordable home directive applied to this chap, but does not seem to apply to the big developers who manage to wriggle out of their obligations,aided by corrupt local councils.

Ivanhoe, thanks for your reply. Thought so.
I liked you scenario and it is what any decent developers would do. These are rare as hens teeth though.

Came across this contribution to the housing debate this morning.
http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/may/30/right-to-buy-ex-whitehall-chief-kerslake
Monday 1 June 2015 8.37am
boroughonian wrote:
I doubt it would ever be financially viable Ivanhoe.

You may well be right, boroughonian.
I suppose there's the possibility that you could increase density and gain extra units (i.e. extra revenue) in that way.
I can think of some of the LA blocks near me which have more open space and fewer floors than any new-build blocks.
How many flats are going to be on the new Heygate dev't, and how many were on the old one? I assumed that there were more in the new one than the old one. However, I have no idea whether this is true, or whether any increase is significant.

...if you press it, they will come.
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