Builder/roofer with head for heights

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Tuesday 27 November 2018 8.32pm
I have two or three slipped slates on my roof, letting in a ton of water.

It's only a two story house, but the roof is high as its an old Victorian property with high ceilings. I'm going to guess at 10 metres.

Can anyone recommend a builder/handyman/roofer who would be able to do this without scaffolding. It's less than a five minute job, so scaffolding seems an overkill solution.
Tuesday 27 November 2018 9.10pm
I think that you should be aware of your responsibilities under the Construction Design and Management Regulations 2015. If you get someone to go up on the roof and they hurt themselves then you are CRIMINALLY liable.

It does not matter whether it is a 2 second job a ten minute job, a two hour one or a two day one. DEATH is a PERMANENT condition for the victim and PRISON is not a fun place to be for the one responsible for the MANSLAUGHTER conviction that would result. To be specific, the penalties are a minimum £20,000 fine AND/OR 12 months in prison up to an UNLIMITED fine AND/OR 2 years in prison depending on how serious the incident was.

Pay for the scaffolding! It is not al all safe otherwise and if you don't and anything goes wrong you will not be able to claim that you did what you were supposed to do, which was to have done whatever was reasonably needed to minimise the risk. Not remove all risk, just do what was reasonable to make it safer.
Tuesday 27 November 2018 11.14pm
Get a grip. I think you will find (in your example) that in the absence of the deceased party, and probably that of a specific contract, the likelihood that it was provable beyond reasonable doubt that anybody other than the deceased made the decision not to use the scaffolding is infinitesimally remote. Are you seriously suggesting that in this metropolis, simple roof repairs without scaffolding are no longer countenanced?
Wednesday 28 November 2018 7.51am
I work in the construction industry. The CDM regulations apply to every construction related job so I know what I am talking about. It applies whether you pay for the work or not. Going up on your own roof without a scaffolding is up to you. Engaging anyone else to do so, even asking or accepting the offer of a relative (suicidally stupid or not), means that you are CRIMINALLY liable if injury or death results. The same is true if you ask them to wire an electrical outlet and they electrocute themselves. The HSE will take one look at the situation above. Ask why there was no scaffolding. If you do not have a sensible answer (being a cheapskate would not convince) they will prosecute you as the client.
Wednesday 28 November 2018 8.14am
I work in the construction industry. The CDM regulations apply to every construction related job so I know what I am talking about. It applies whether you pay for the work or not. Going up on your own roof without a scaffolding is up to you. Engaging anyone else to do so, even asking or accepting the offer of a relative (suicidally stupid or not), means that you are CRIMINALLY liable if injury or death results. The same is true if you ask them to wire an electrical outlet and they electrocute themselves. The HSE will take one look at the situation above. Ask why there was no scaffolding. If you do not have a sensible answer (being a cheapskate would not convince) they will prosecute you as the client.

Let me be clear here about the sort of person who would be prepared to go up on a high, steep, slippery, fragile, unguarded roof to carry out repairs. Any competent roofer will say they wonít do it without a scaffold. If they donít then that are not competent. If they are not competent then why are you trusting them to go up on your roof in the first place where they could do no end of further damage to a fragile slate roof, never mind themselves and then, by liability, you.
Wednesday 28 November 2018 8.54am
@boroughbloke I am aware and sort of agree. However there is for example a window cleaner around here who uses ladders for easily this height and must have some form of insurance for that.

So please calm down. I'm looking for someone insured, who can do this safely, and if there is no other option I'll of course get the scaffolding.

The slipped tiles are easily within the reach of a ladder and require no access onto the roof itself, so (without being kept on for allegedly killing people) I'd like to see if anyone has some suggestions.
Wednesday 28 November 2018 9.24am
Window cleaning is not construction and insurance does not protect you from criminal prosecution. Moreover, the scaffolding would not just be there to arrest a falling person. It would also be there to arrest falling slates from what is clearly a fragile roof.

DO NOT ENGAGE a jobbing moron, who says he has a head for heights, to do this work. Speak to a reputable roofing company. If they are reputable then they will tell you that a scaffold is required for anything other than works to the gutters. Up to you if they say no problem, we can do that, but you have been warned what your obligations under law are and what the penalties are if it all goes horribly wrong.
Wednesday 28 November 2018 2.36pm
Doodlebug1, I will PM you with a name of a good roofer who may or may not use scaffolding depending on what is required. Quite agree the rules have tightened but what I observe round here, with lots of Georgian roofs is that for a couple of tiles they will use a ladder, anything else and it is scaffolding. Good luck
Wednesday 28 November 2018 2.45pm
I also note that a domestic client is not liable under these regs, the contractor is;

http://www.hse.gov.uk/construction/cdm/2015/domestic-clients.htm
Wednesday 28 November 2018 6.12pm
Perhaps Mr Boroughbloke needs to go for a refresher course as he clearly doesn't understand the rules he cites. It should be obvious to anyone that a private individual would not be required to have a knowledge of this technical H&S standard.
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