London SE1 community website

Helping the elderly during C19

Join in these discussions today! Log in or register.
Pages:  1 2 Next
Current: 1 of 2
Sunday 15 March 2020 11.48am
Hi All

Has anyone got any suggestions on how we ensure the 70+ people in the local area are getting what they need - especially if they are in lock down. I am happy to do shops and drops. Or how we know who might be vulnerable and need support?

Im based in bermondsey spa.

Julia
Sunday 15 March 2020 4.33pm
Ring elderly care social services, the should point you in right direction. Or Julia ask Southwark News or South London Press to run article. Wonderful idea....Bless you...
Sunday 15 March 2020 8.29pm
There's an Age UK centre along Southwark Park Rd, might be worthwhile giving them a call? 020 7237 0860
Sunday 15 March 2020 9.46pm
There’s apparently Facebook/WhatsApp groups also being set up aimed at pulling together to help those in need.

More info from the metro: https://metro.co.uk/2020/03/15/can-help-others-struggling-coronavirus-pandemic-12399843/
Monday 16 March 2020 10.26am
Julia7239 wrote:
Hi All
Has anyone got any suggestions on how we ensure the 70+ people in the local area are getting what they need - especially if they are in lock down. I am happy to do shops and drops. Or how we know who might be vulnerable and need support?

Im based in bermondsey spa.

Julia

Southwark has far fewer 'old' people than most parts of the country - but it's still 8% of the borough's population - about 25,000 of us. And up till now most of us have been totally independent - we've not relied on social services so they know nothing about us. And frankly I'm willing to take my chances with the rest of the population. The idea of precautionary 'lockdown' - not for a week or so if I catch the bug but for four months so that I don't! - and relying on neighbours to keep me fed and watered, is a prospect I find appalling. Anyway, I can pass for 69 in a good light.
Monday 16 March 2020 11.24am
Well said John C. I'm nowhere near 70, but this sounds like complete overkill to me. There are already concerns over the mental and physical welfare of people in their 70s, 80s and above due to isolation and loneliness. Being forced to stay indoors for months with little or no outside contact sounds like a living death to me - especially if you don't even have a balcony or garden to escape to. This also assumes that all over 70s live on their own, or with other people in the same age group, which is far from the case, so how do you stop the rest of the under-70s household members bringing the virus home with them? Apart from these considerations, I have no idea what % of the UK population is over 70, but we're talking in the millions, so who exactly is going to deliver food and other essentials to several million households for months on end? It's a logistical nightmare and an ill-thought-out 'plan' by Government ministers with a distinct lack of brain cells. OK - rant over!
Monday 16 March 2020 3.35pm
Maybe just putting up a poster in the block you live offering assistance to anyone who may have to self isolate e.g. getting them some bread , milk etc - and then people can write there flat number on it and what they need ?

(not just over 70's having to self isolate, im not yet ive had to self isolate and outside of my work colleagues , i dont know anyone - luckily being ex forces and work at a lot of big events - ive always kept a stock of bags of pasta , canned food , 7 days of dehydrated food , water sterilisation tablets in a "zombie apocalypse" backpack :) )
Monday 16 March 2020 5.15pm
ninja999 wrote:
...
(not just over 70's having to self isolate, im not yet ive had to self isolate and outside of my work colleagues , i dont know anyone - luckily being ex forces and work at a lot of big events - ive always kept a stock of bags of pasta , canned food , 7 days of dehydrated food , water sterilisation tablets in a "zombie apocalypse" backpack :) )

Sorry to hear about your need to self-isolate, ninja999 - and glad that you're well prepared. I've been trying to stock up (empty supermarket shelves allowing) - but just for a week or so, in case I go down with the bug - not for four months house-arrest 'for my own good'!

But shed no tears for the over-70s. They, for the most part, are not the ones who have to spend two hours a day on crowded trains or buses, who mingle in the masses of people at railway stations, on City streets and in coffee shops, who work in busy offices, stores and public buildings, who sit in intense meetings with colleagues and strangers, whose job as a plumber or electrician or delivery man takes them into the homes of those who are not self-isolating, who go out with friends in the evening to restaurants, pubs, concerts or shows. Or the NHS staff who will have to sort out the mess.

Over-70s (God bless us, every one!) are already less likely to come in contact with a sufferer from the corona virus than younger members of society are. Admittedly, if we do, the consequences may be worse for us. Which after all is what it's all about. Isolating over-70s 'for their own protection' means less likelihood of them falling ill and demanding scarce NHS resources like ventilators and hospital beds. Of course, when we all come out of purdah in four months time - having had no chance to build up any resistance in the meantime - and the corona virus is still around, we'll all go down with the disease straight away. But by that time there'll be plenty of NHS ventilators and comfortable hospital beds to die in - and at least the government will be able to show that it's 'flattened the curve'.

Keep well, everybody.
Monday 16 March 2020 7.10pm
I see Boris is now saying '... the measures were not aimed at the "generality of over 70s who are healthy". He says the guidance for those over 70 is the same as for people of working age, except that the government strongly advises social distancing measures.'

However 'measures on shielding will be for those who have "significant health conditions". They will be contacted by the NHS, he says.' So I wait to hear whether the NHS thinks I have a 'significant health condition'.

Panic over - it means I can offer to help my next door neighbour, who is about fifteen years younger than me.

(But I still object to the assumption that at 76 I am no longer 'of working age' - and that I have no work to do. The fact that I am no longer regularly paid hasn't stopped me working!)
Wednesday 18 March 2020 3.37pm
I’m over 70, in very good health and quite fit but I’ve already begun my self isolation for a number of reasons. The likelihood is that everyone will catch the virus eventually, even those about to be under mandatory isolation (over 70s and other vulnerable peeps). The government’s plan (not BoJo’s but experts who understand how these things work) is that by putting off the exposure of over 70s, people with disabilities and people with complications like diabetes is to allow the general population who are less likely to need NHS services to go through the huge surge of illness which will happen over the next 3 months while the NHS builds up its resources of ventilators, icu beds and hopefully meds which ameliorate the disease so that in 12 or so weeks when older and other vulnerable people get sick there are already resources in place to save their lives should it come to that. There are already reports of a few known existing meds which appear to be very useful against Corvid-19 but until they receive more testing they won’t be used for the general public. Given these are existing meds they don’t have to go through trials for safety only trials that they work. Here’s an example

I think your wanting to help is exemplary. A few of my neighbours have already emailed me with offers to help if I need it and each time I’m quite touched. That alone has value. I read an article about a woman who was putting cards with her contact details and offers to help in local people’s post boxes either offering to help those under mandated isolation or asking for info about who might need such help. While this doesn’t apply to me some elderly people facing isolation will suffer from loneliness and even offering to have a five minute phone conversation with them daily would I think be really appreciated. And as you say food shopping and meds are major issues. Someone above said Southwark’s elderly were “only” 8% but with a population of about 300,000 that means 24,000 elderly plus other vulnerable people there will be many many who would be grateful for some help if you can find them. I wish you luck and thank you for your attempt to be helpful.
Pages:  1 2 Next
Current: 1 of 2

To post a message, please log in or register..
We are part of
Independent Community News Network
Email newsletter

For the latest local news and events direct to your inbox every Monday, you need our weekly email newsletter SE1 Direct.

7,000+ locals read it every week. Can you afford to miss out?

Read the latest issue before signing up

Also on the forum
Views expressed in this discussion forum are those of the contributors and may not reflect the editorial policy of this website. Please read our terms and conditions