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Southwark Street building [TfL / Landmark Court / Crossbones]

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Thursday 18 June 2020 10.28pm
Didn't they find Roman graves opposite the hop Exchange? If the builds are going back to union street,, surely the will affect the graves of the poor girls
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Friday 19 June 2020 2.08pm
Not Roman. I assume you're referring to the Cross Bones site. Anything more you want to know can be found here

As for Roman remains in parts of Southwark, it's more difficult to avoid them than find them.
Friday 19 June 2020 2.16pm
The Roman mansio mentioned in the article was towards the Southwark Street side of the site.

https://twitter.com/se1/statuses/729720483806117893

Jan: whilst the planning application boundary goes as far south as Union Street, the proposed buildings do not.

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Friday 19 June 2020 2.19pm
No Spartacus, definitely in Southwark street, after graves were discovered I remember peering through. I wonder if museum of London would have kept record. I know Crossbones, as I recall opposite the Catholic Church ...?
Friday 19 June 2020 4.17pm
Jan the old one wrote:
No Spartacus, definitely in Southwark street, after graves were discovered I remember peering through. I wonder if museum of London would have kept record. I know Crossbones, as I recall opposite the Catholic Church ...?

You are right about the Roman graves, Jan - a summary from the official archaeological report on the excavations on the site carried out in the 1980s, published in the Transactions of the London and Middlesex Archaeological Society:

"The earliest recorded features have been dated to c. 2,000 BC. Use of the area in the later prehistoric period is shown by the presence of Iron Age or early Roman gullies, after which clay and timber Buildings 1, 2 and 3 were constructed in c. AD 60-7O. These were succeeded by a substantial masonry complex: Buildings 4 and 5. This seems to have had a public or official function, perhaps as a mansio. Two phases of clay and timber buildings postdated the complex and were probably refurbishments of the Flavian building. They are notable for incorporating mosaic floors, painted wall-plaster, as well as hypocausts. Masonry additions followed in the mid 2nd and 3rd centuries. Towards the end of the Roman period the area was used as an inhumation cemetery. Deposits of dark grey silt sealed the horizontally-bedded Roman layers and burials, and these were cut by medieval and postmedieval pits."

A 'mansio' was not an ordinary hotel, it was a government-run establishment for people travelling on official business.

The finds and the detailed records will be preserved in the Museum of London's Archaeological Archive - the Museum will also have the skeletons from the Roman cemetery. And I imagine they would all be available for display in a Southwark museum if requested! Sadly the Museum of London itself is going all trendy and its planned new museum in Smithfield will have little space to display any archaeological finds.
Friday 19 June 2020 11.31pm
Thank you for that excellent information John C. I knew I had peered in remember seeing some excavation. What I had forgotten was how long ago it took place! I wish I was more aware when I was younger I would loved to have assisted in a dig..
Where any artefacts found no taken to Museum of London? Out of idle curiosity was the Museum opened in 1980s? And does Southwark have any museums at all? Is Hornimans still open...

Again thank you John C...its just enough time before midnight for me to do a bit of digging..metaphorically speaking...
Saturday 20 June 2020 1.50pm
Where is the Cummings Museum now after the fire at the Walworth Road Town Hall?
I loved that museum, so handily close and visitor friendly.
Saturday 20 June 2020 3.54pm
Thebunhouse wrote:
Where is the Cummings Museum now after the fire at the Walworth Road Town Hall?
I loved that museum, so handily close and visitor friendly.

There are plans to open a new 'Southwark Heritage Centre' (combined with a new Walworth library) on the ground floor of the new Elephant Park buildings facing onto Walworth Road to the north of the old town hall, which will include material from the old Cuming collections in its displays. There were several public consultations last year - for example https://consultations.southwark.gov.uk/environment-leisure/wl-shc-engagement-3/
and scroll down to click on 'Design options' to see plans and artist's impressions of the interior and exterior.

I believe it was planned to open some time later this year, but I don't know how far the lockdown has delayed the programme, and haven't been past there recently.

At a time when many local authorities are cutting back and closing their local museums, Southwark Council should be given credit for their commitment to the project.

However, it's a pity we're going to lose the name of Henry Syer Cuming (and before anyone asks, he wasn't a slave trader! But his older brother was disinherited for marrying a Roman Catholic, so I suppose you could accuse the family of being racists).

From Wikipedia:
"Cuming collected thousands of objects from the ordinary lives of south Londoners in the 1800s, from theatre adverts and rail tickets, to cheap toys and good luck charms. His collection included thousands of ancient objects dug up by labourers building the canals, docks and railways that profoundly changed London in the 18th and 19th centuries."
"When Cuming died on 7 October 1902, he left the family's collection of 100,000 objects to the then parish of St Mary Newington, with the sum of 8,000 and instructions that the parish should open a museum bearing the family name. An addition was built onto the Newington Library building, and the museum was opened on 10 October 1906 by Lord Rothschild. Due to the wide array of items displayed, the Cuming Museum was billed upon opening as the 'British Museum in miniature'."
Saturday 20 June 2020 6.34pm
John C wrote:
Sadly the Museum of London itself is going all trendy and its planned new museum in Smithfield will have little space to display any archaeological finds.

Sad indeed. The fascination of seeing the real (not virtual) artifacts (mitigated by the desire to handle them) is the main attraction!

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