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Monday 3 October 2005 9.32am
I wonder if anyone could help me - i am still on OS9 and think it is about time to finally make the leap to OSX ... however I have lots of concerns (I use my mac for work so really need reliable help):
is my software compatible (I know I can use some through classic)
how do I manage fonts
how do I link to the internet (also a bt broadband user)
are my printers compatible; ditto my scanner
how do I write pdfs if my software isn't compatible
is it possible to write a session on a Cd rather than the whole CD (currently use toast which lets me do that)
can I create a network to include an ibook
currently use internet explorer but apparently need to upgrade to safari or mozilla - is it possible o import my favourites? and how about my outlook express address book?
Help? anyone?

Monday 3 October 2005 10.56am
Julie

I made the move to OSX 18 months ago to prepare the way for Belinda (who is still on OS9/Quark4.11 etc etc). The OSX/Classic approach seemed weird to me and threw up one major problem - don't run Norton under OS9 when you have OSX loaded because Norton will completly fry the OSX installation. Having done that once I decided to back up the Powerbook and load OSX only.

OSX installation is straightforward and Safari/Mail/Addressbook will deal with most of your browsing/email/address requirements. I also loaded iView (I don't like iPhoto), Toast (I know it), Adobe CS, Office for X and Appleworks.

Culturally, its a huge step but OSX doesn't seem to crash and all the techie stuff for networking is buried out of sight.

On the broadband front, we got a router with our Demon broadband package. The router does all the broadband negotiation and doubles as an ethernet hub which makes life a bit simpler. And, because the router negotiates the connection, you're online when you hookup the Mac because OSX autodetects the connection.

If you want anymore info, email me offgroup 101355dot1367atcompuservedotcom (replacing the dots and at).

Niall
Tuesday 4 October 2005 8.31am
Froggy - one thing to do is to make sure you have enough RAM installed. Apple are notoriously stingy when it comes to having installed in the machine in the first place. 512Mb is really the minimum under OSX when you're trying to run applications like Word and so on, but it will feel a lot faster if you have 1Gb or more. RAM prices are always dropping, so check out crucial.com, but make sure you enter the details for your model of iBook or you might end up ordering RAM for a different generation of iBook. As far as making the most of the software that comes with your iBook (iTunes, iPhoto, iMovie and iDVD), you could do worse than check out Jim Heid's Mac iLife website for tips to begin with.

Julie - I'm sure Niall will help you with most of it since he's local. But on some of your specific points:

* Font management: Linotype have just released a new free font management tool for OSX which is great. http://www.linotype.com/fontexplorerX

* Mac OSX comes with PDF creation built into the operating system. Any document you go to print, you can choose instead to 'save as PDF'. Apple's 'Preview' application is smaller, lighter and faster than Adobe's Acrobat reader for reading PDFs. If you want to do more complicated PDF creation, you'll probably still have to buy the full version of Acrobat, but you may be able to find free/shareware tools here: http://www.versiontracker.com/macosx/index.shtml

* For writing CD's I find it is still better to stick to Toast. Mac OSX still only does disk-at-once instead of letting you write sessions.

* Networking is much smarter (and easier in my experience) on Mac OSX.

* Yes, you can import IE favourites into Safari or Firefox/Mozilla. Same with Outlook into Mail I believe. I switched from Eudora into Mail with no problems.

One thing I have discovered with my Powerbook is that you need to keep about 10% of hard disk capacity free for the virtual memory to operate efficiently. Mac OSX is far more stable than OS9 or older (if an application crashes it is very very exceptional for it to take others/the Finder with it), precisely because it has better memory management. But you still have to give it space to work. I discovered how important this was after almost writing off my hard disk by filling it up with music in iTunes.
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