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SE 1........Used To Be Brilliant....

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Current: 18 of 22
Saturday 12 July 2008 11.11pm
A question to anyone - how often do we know the person we meet when we walk up and down the streets?

How often do we make a snap judgement - branding him or her.

This leads often to misunderstandings - we tend to judge people by face value rather than getting to know what their real views and opinions are.

I just find it so difficult to understand why some people have to be branded as an outsider and some not.

Perhaps someone wants to be part of the community but what do that person need to do proving this? Do we need to appreciate the old traditions, how people who used to live in this area built this community by their own hands?

I find this difficult because I do not know who these people are - neither would they just come up to me and say 'hey welcome to the community'.

Many times there's a wish of belonging - but often someone else's judgement prohibits any efforts to extend that into action because we decide to brand someone differently from themselves, and hence 'insider' and 'outsider'.

I just wish we talked about individuals rather than we and them. Perhaps then we'll appreciate more old values and history but also a greater understanding of what is' them'. Am I multi- cultural because of my skin colour or do I belong to the old guard because I can symphatise with someone who has lived and worked in this community for a longer time than me?

Someone please tell me if I am an outsider or not...
Saturday 12 July 2008 11.49pm
Rambling Phil wrote:
Tolstoy - Can I second Philpotts' encomium? You point out well the tensions brought by the changes our money-led society imposes.
Your points about a lack of involvement by the working incomers in the community sparked a couple of thoughts.

Many of my friends who have moved to SE1 "recently" are deeply involved in local charities, campaigns and community organisations, in spite of the constraints their careers impose.

I think the major differentiator is not a lack of time, but commitment. There are many young professionals who move to SE1 with no commitment to the area and who simply see it as somewhere to live for a small number of years before being committed to a life of 2.4 children in the suburbs. They will not get involved.

However, it is a two way thing. Last year I was at a community event and someone from Southwark College asked whether I'd be interested in evening classes. I was, but pointed out that it is impossible for most people working in office jobs in the centre of town to get to a 7pm class having grabbed a bite to eat. I was told that the courses weren't really intended for people with jobs (I'm pretty sure that was her phrase), but for the community.

One person, one anecdote, but I found it interesting that this "community" organisation had no intention of organising itself to help white-collar workers be involved, and that this one person didn't expect real members of the community to work.



Well yes - young professionals may not have a very strong incentive to be engaged in the community and most often this will be the case - only a stop-over. But your thinking is wrong from the first place because it deters us from wanting to become committed when we hear this. Sad.
Sunday 13 July 2008 8.19am
Why am I confused by the last posting? Wanting to be involved in the community presupposes and intention be become part of the community in the future - even if you are a newcomer. I've only been in Se1 for six years (previously from Se5 so not far off) but the minute I arrived I "enlisted" because I'm not planning on moving again. And indeed moved here because I saw it as an area with a whole lot of exciting new projects (which I, alas, probably wont live to see). I'm also involved in my block, and I'd be involved anywhere. It's a personal trait in my view. Some people feel inspired to put in their two bits, and some people just cant be bothered.
Monday 14 July 2008 8.40am
Hi Limpan,

I share Jackie's confusion. The last thing I want to do is to deter people.

Perhaps I could have made myself clearer. How about:
"Many of my child-free young(ish) professional friends who have moved to SE1 "recently" are deeply involved in local charities, campaigns and community organisations, in spite of the constraints their careers impose" ?

Jackie is right - it's about wanting to be involved (ie put in your two bits, or being committed to the place you live).
Monday 14 July 2008 10.26am
Rambling Phil wrote:
Hi Limpan,
I share Jackie's confusion. The last thing I want to do is to deter people.

Perhaps I could have made myself clearer. How about:
"Many of my child-free young(ish) professional friends who have moved to SE1 "recently" are deeply involved in local charities, campaigns and community organisations, in spite of the constraints their careers impose" ?

Jackie is right - it's about wanting to be involved (ie put in your two bits, or being committed to the place you live).

But if your not careful phil/jackie your posts can deter people and give a them a "them and us" feel. being part of the comunity is not just about volunteering for charity work/campaigning etc. Many people rightly or more likely wrongly think they do not have the skills to do this and don't get involved in this way for that reason. You risk implying (although I know that's not what you mean to do) that if you are not invloved in these ways it's your fault you don't feel part of the community.

Simply going to community open/fun days, and poping along to the church fate, meeting people or buying a cup of tea at the playgoup fund raising stall etc etc, using the local facilities, football pitch, shops etc is just as much being part and belonging to the community, as running them is. Afterall if no body supports them then there is no point is having them
Monday 14 July 2008 10.32am
Heavens! Of COURSE going along to activities is what it's all about! What a curious idea that I'm trying to imply that if you arent doing "good works" or sitting on committees you arent part of the community. That's just daft. Getting out and being part of it is all that one needs to be involved. And I'm happy to say that this Forum is a fabulous part of it.
Wednesday 27 August 2008 11.42am
Did anyone see Secret Millionaire last night?

the guy on there said that he'd made loads of friends, and met people who said hello, and knew his name, in two weeks in Easington, working for local council, and at his home, only his next door neighbour, and the guy across the road know his name, and he's been there ten years.

the point is it's all about how he was getting involved with the local community - on the programme, he was deliberatly going out of his way to meet local people, introduce himself, talk to locals etc, to get an idea of where he could help most, and conversely at home, he obviously wasn't that concerned with his local community, didn't get out and about the local area, and hence in ten years, only two other local people knew his name.

this is the point - you won't feel part of the community unless you take active steps to be part of the community.
Wednesday 27 August 2008 2.53pm
I'm still loving it....13 years on. When it does go wrong don't forget its not the place its the people...from inconsiderate and selfish residents to the Council teying to dictate to residents instead of responding to them. Get involved and enjoy the place and all it has to offer.
Wednesday 27 August 2008 3.24pm
I totally agree with JonR. If you dont talk to people, they dont talk to you. So no moaning that you dont know your neighbours!!
Thursday 28 August 2008 2.42pm
I moved here in 92 and loved the fact that it was so close to the river but was in danger of becoming a sprawling sink estate, I remember the excitement when a new restaurant leaflet dropped through my (then) council flat letterbox, called the Honest Cabbage, this restaurant preceded the Garrisson and was one of the first signs of regeneration of Bermondsey street, SE1 has improved greatly and continues to improve especially with the mixture of new apartments next to council blocks
Current: 18 of 22

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