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Overkill?

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Thursday 26 March 2009 5.27pm
I'm glad to hear it's still happening, that plot is beginning to look rather tatty what with the broken windows boarded up and that annoying 'Bankside Mix' vinyl poster peeling off the other ones. Let's also hope the other retail units start being occupied, though I doubt anything interesting will move into them.
Friday 27 March 2009 12.09pm
You're probably right about the "interestingness" of the potential occupiers of the remaining retail units - looking around me now at the people in RBS who will eventually occupy 2&3, they fit their stereotype thus their demands are pretty low - Pub, Pret, M&S. All currently catered for. This is the thing about "bankers", it;s not their perceived pay package everyone shodl egt worked up abaout, it the mundanity they bring to any environment the occupy...

I'd expect a Pizza Express and a Subway fairly soon.

As an SE1 resident, I'm just happy to be near El Vergel for my lunch!
Friday 27 March 2009 3.13pm
chibaken wrote:
This is the thing about "bankers", it;s not their perceived pay package everyone shodl egt worked up abaout, it the mundanity they bring to any environment the occupy...

Wow, tjalk aboout useing a broard brusch! Anythink too say about the spellyg abilitea of "bankers"?
Friday 27 March 2009 7.37pm
Chibaken was probably looking over their shoulder whilst typing given the time of posting, but I think in more general terms he/she would be right in their assumptions; minorities change the world, not the Locale where they work;)

Shame that mind.
Saturday 28 March 2009 1.23am
Tolstoy wrote:
Chibaken was probably looking over their shoulder whilst typing given the time of posting, but I think in more general terms he/she would be right in their assumptions; minorities change the world, not the Locale where they work;)

I fail to see how it was chibaken's assumption that 'minorities change the world, not the Locale where they work'. But surely you aren't referring to the assumption that "it;s not their ["bankers"] perceived pay package everyone shodl egt worked up abaout, it the mundanity they bring to any environment the occupy...[sic, sic, sic, sic, sic]"

Whatever chibaken means by the term "bankers", surely such a statement is at the very least over-broad, but perhaps also offensive, insulting and narrow minded. If I understand it correctly (and perhaps I don't) it is chibaken's view that "banker" = mundane.

It is grotesquely unfair to blame "bankers" for the sucess of Pret, Subway...in fact, pick a fast food franchise of your choice. I would have thought that high rents and staggering marketing budgets are the more likely culprits. Consider, for example, that McDonalds (whether you like it or not) - and some of the other chains mentioned by chibaken - are phenomenally popular in locales far from the "banker" crowd.

Furthermore, and beginning from the premise that we all - as residents of SE1, believe our neighbourhood is a dynamic, interesting and vibrant one - chibaken must surely ask how this could be - given that there are unddoubtedly "bankers" (some of whom may be extremely wealthy) in our midst and that they - inevitably, according to chibaken - bring mundanity to "any environment the [sic] occupy".

I have worked with "bankers" (subject to a more precise definition being provided) for many years, and I must say I am having difficulty understanding this view. "Bankers", like any other cross-segment of our society, are a diverse lot with many varying personalities, interests, aspirations and backgrounds. I have found that they are a high-achieving, intelligent, literate, and fascinating segment of society.

I must wonder whether there is some chip on chibaken's shoulder. Don't blame the "bankers" because Pret (et al) have prime retail space - why not look to the developers who have entered contractual relationships with those retail businesses, or the fast food franchises themselves for having sufficient resources to drive rents up and enter long-term leases.

Using chibaken's argument (a position which appears to be based entirely on a personal view or bias) I suppose one could argue (if such were one's view) that people who live in counsel housing, collect benefits, work at manual labour, have blue eyes, are homosexual, drive silver coloured cars, are christian, drink rioja, prefer dogs over cats, wear puma but never adidas, like the colour blue or, indeed, are "bankers", will bring mundanity to any enviornment they occupy.

Sorry, but what a load of firk'n bollocks.

I would like to point out today's BBC story about development in New Delhi (India) and, in particular a shopping mall. The point was made that every shop in the mall was occupied by a major western brand typically seen in a UK high street or shopping mall. At no point in the story did either the journalist or local experts blame this phenomenon on the "bankers".

I would suggest chibaken stop listening to Gordon Brown and Alistair Darling - you simply cannot blame everything on the "bankers".

Enjoy El Vergel, but don't be surprised if the person seated nearest to you is a "banker".
Saturday 28 March 2009 10.36am
deek wrote:
Enjoy El Vergel, but don't be surprised if the person seated nearest to you is a "banker".

It was full of loud, obnoxious lawyers from Southwark Crown Court when I was in there last.
Saturday 28 March 2009 10.43am
Now now let's not get carried away. It's a little unfortunate that a simple adjustment of lettering allows us to arrive at an alternative rendering of 'bankers', but yes, we do have to be wary of the stereotype, problem is they haven't done themselves any favours in recent years if the current shenanigans are a true reflection of their trade. In any case, as chibaken explains, it's the IT staff moving so the reference is moot.

My admittedly obscure call to 'minorities' reflects on my time with the so called Britart crowd and YBA's long before either title was coined and the streets of Hoxton became 'trendy'. With nights aplenty spent at many a dodgy dive in drunken, drug addled stupor in shady parts of Shoreditch unbeknownst to most, and days befuddled with hangovers, the area had a life all its own created by those with little but a passion for ideas. Yes, many had comfortable upbringings and could be said to be merely bumming it for the buzz it offered, but there was a bond of shared ideals that precluded the showbizz razzmatazz that was to follow. As ever happens, the gang created a buzz, freezing their bollocks (and lack of) off in damp, ice cold studios, me included, before tipping a nod to the boss and accepting the coin that would lead to a less furtive existence and the creation of an insatiable art market that poorly serves the creative breadth of talent in its midst. Hoxton in that time was a lived experience by and for locals, space was cheap, dereliction lay all about. As the hype around the gang grew so the curiosity of estate agents was piqued and to many of us there then, so the area began to lose its edge and the texture and fabric of street life changed. Inevitable I know and a precursor to new experience no doubt; this I understand but it is the nature of that experience which concerns me and in the case of Southwark St it isn't looking to inviting.

The majority indeed are happy with another outlet of that which they recognise as befits a 'retail experience' and no doubt Subway, Pizza Express (god forbid) will arrive on 'their' doorstep, but as is ever my complaint here, it doesn't reflect on the values of the local community and its desire to grow and be recognised as having value in its own right. When all the streets of every town look all the same for all, are we to only retire to museums and glass cases to view our shared history?
Monday 6 April 2009 10.54am
LOL deek, my, that's a hell of a kneejerk reaction! Your poor keyboard, all those angry words! If you read my post you'll see that I work for RBS. The "broad brush" I use is taken from my 15 years experience as an investment banker.

One of the more frustrating parts of this environment is that the extra curricular social activites tend to focus on the mundane - lunch is always the same, suggestions of "something different" is met with blank looks. Believe me, the VAST majority of people I have worked with are happy with pints of Stella and a Pret sandwich. Eating out on a Thursday evening is a no-no.

So these are not preconceptions, nor banker-bashing; these are opinions borne out of years of experience.

As Tolstoy suggests, the majority are happy with identikit retails outlets, and this does not necessarily benefit the SE1 community.


PS your dig about my spelling - not very cool
Wednesday 11 November 2009 10.36pm
Two bits of Bankside Mix news which are interesting in the light of earlier observations in this thread.

Firstly, a very small branch of WHSmith is opening next to Pret:
http://www.london-se1.co.uk/blog/gallery/?image_id=9

Secondly, Henry Dimbleby of Leon says that business at the Bankside branch is up 40 per cent since Amano shut down:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2009/nov/09/henry-dimbleby-diary-leon-healthy-fast-food

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Thursday 12 November 2009 4.26pm
Shame it's a small branch of WHSmith. Wonder if it will be open at the weekends. As a local resident, it's good to see the units in Bankside Mix being populated.
Thanks James
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