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Man dies after collapsing in Kennington police cell

A man arrested outside St Thomas' Hospital died after collapsing while in custody at Kennington Police Station, according to the Metropolitan Police.

At about 3.45am on Monday 28 November police were called to a disturbance in the vicinity of St Thomas' Hospital by staff. Police attended and a 55-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of a racially-aggravated public order offence.

The man was taken into custody at Brixton Police Station. On arrival the custody sergeant asked for him to be taken to hospital due to concerns about a head injury he was suffering from prior to his arrest. The man was taken to Kings College Hospital where he was treated and then discharged. Police then took the man back to Brixton Police Station at about 6.30am.

At about 9.30am the man complained to officers that he felt unwell and was taken by ambulance to King's College Hospital. He was discharged from hospital at approx 4.30ppm and taken back into custody at Kennington Police Station in Kennington Road. Police say that the man was placed in a monitored cell and regular checks carried out on his welfare.

Just before 10pm he was found collapsed in his cell and emergency first aid was performed. He was taken to St Thomas' Hospital by ambulance where he remained in a critical condition until he died on Wednesday evening at about 6pm.

A post mortem on Friday 2 December gave the cause of death as a heart condition.

Police believe they know the identity of the man but are waiting for his next-of-kin to be informed.

The Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) was informed of the incident and had been managing the investigation but has determined that it should be passed back to the MPS to deal with as a local investigation. The IPCC assessment found no evidence of any police misconduct or criminal behaviour.

The MPS Directorate of Professional Standards is investigating. The coroner has been informed and an inquest will open and adjourn in due course.

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