Designers use Thames mud to create crockery range

This week a young duo from this year's Designers in Residence at the Design Museum began their project to turn mud from the bottom of the River Thames into kitchenware.

Designers use Thames mud to create crockery range

Now in its fifth year, the Design Museum's annual Designers in Residence programme supports designers at an early stage in their career.

Oscar Medley-Whitfield and Harry Trimble's residency takes inspiration from Southwark's historic and ceramics industry, tapping into the unused resource of Thames clay to create a range of products that revive the history of ceramics in the area around the Design Museum.

This year's Designers in Residence were asked to respond to the theme of 'thrift' and to explore the idea of economy and resourcefulness in an object, an environment or an experience.

The results will be exhibited at the Design Museum from 5 September.

• Digging on the Thames foreshore requires a licence from the Port of London Authority.

• Medley-Whitfield and Trimble are not the only artists to use Thames clay; earlier this week Bankside STEWards held an open workshop to make pots which will be fired in a bonfire on the beach during The Mayor's Thames Festival next month.

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