London SE1 website team

New architect for Potters Fields

Berkeley Homes and Southwark Council have chosen the new architect for Potters Fields.

Leading architects Squire and Partners have been selected to design a new development for the controversial site alongside City Hall.

The appointment of the new architect has been achieved ahead of schedule and it is expected that initial designs could be made available for public consultation in September.

“The partnership steering group was impressed by the thought that has gone into the pitch by Squire and Partners," says Southwark Council leader Nick Stanton.

"We are confident that in collaboration with Berkeley Homes we will deliver a world-class design that provides best value for our residents and a new cultural asset."

Tony Pidgely, managing director of The Berkeley Group, said: “We are looking forward to working with Squire and Partners to produce an exciting new development for this very special site that will bring much needed housing to this area of London. We are very pleased that the steering group unanimously supported the choice of architect.”

Michael Squire of Squire and Partners said: "This is a unique location next to the world heritage site and mayor's headquarters. Working with our clients and the community we look forward to evolving a design worthy of its context."

An earlier design by Ian Ritchie was heavily criticised as being inappropriate for a site so close to the Tower of London. The land is owned by Berkeley Homes and Southwark Council.

"It is regrettable that the leader of Southwark Council never took the opportunity to meet or engage with us, or to discuss in public with us the scheme's planning, architecture and the proposed uses," said Ian Ritchie in a statement issued earlier this month.

"The decision by Southwark Council and Berkeley Homes to agree to seek, from other architects, a new design upon the same site, to a very similar brief, is regrettable, This is particularly so as construction of the scheme had already begun. It is difficult to comprehend and is beyond the issue of architecture."

The SE1 website is supported by people like you

Please join our membership scheme or sponsor an hour of local reporting so we can survive

You can also make a small payment to say 'thank you' for this article with Tibit:

This article on a map


Keep up with SE1 news

We have three email newsletters for you to choose from: