London SE1 community website

23-storey "queasy" Black Prince Road tower approved by inspector

London SE1 website team

Plans for a 23-storey tower on Black Prince Road in North Lambeth have been approved by a planning inspector after a public inquiry was held at the end of August.

23-storey

In February Lambeth Council's Planning Applications Committee had refused planning permission for the development of 101 homes designed by Keith Williams Architects.

The site is currently occupied by Parliament House, a vacant 7-storey 1960s office block.

Speaking at the time, Lib Dem councillor Brian Palmer said: "Not even the architect's best friend would describe it as an elegant building. The quirkiness extends to very odd angles that could make one queasy looking at it. They seem to bend around in various directions that would be apparent without drugs or alcoholic beverages."

Developer Ristoia appealed against Lambeth's decision and planning inspector Kenneth Barton held a public inquiry in August.

The inspector found in favour of the scheme and has granted planning permission.

He found that the tower's effect on views from Westminster and Trafalgar Square would be "negligible".

Considering views from Millbank, he ruled: "I consider that the verticality of the proposed tower would contrast with the horizontality of the Fire Brigade building."

Princes Ward Labour councillor Mark Harrison said: "It's a shame that planning rules mean that an unelected quango can overrule the decision taken by councillors. Local people felt this building was too tall and too dense."

This development is just across the road from the proposed Florian Place redevelopment of the former London Fire Brigade headquarters. The plans include a new 16-storey building.

The SE1 website is supported by people like you
This article on a map
Map
Related forum discussions
Keep up with SE1 news

We have three email newsletters for you to choose from:

We are part of
Independent Community News Network
Email newsletter

For the latest local news and events direct to your inbox every Monday, you need our weekly email newsletter SE1 Direct.

7,000+ locals read it every week. Can you afford to miss out?

Read the latest issue before signing up

Archive
News archive from February 1999 to January 2001
Got a story for us?
Contact us with your tip-offs and story ideas.